Ivy Cheung runs a small, 1-acre lavender farm on her Fall City property. Lavender blooms in force during July. Aaron Kunkler/Staff photo

Ivy Cheung runs a small, 1-acre lavender farm on her Fall City property. Lavender blooms in force during July. Aaron Kunkler/Staff photo

Fall City lavender farm set to bloom

Ivy Cheung grows lavender on her small family farm.

Lavender is in the cards for Ivy Cheung’s farm in Fall City, which has been pumping out the flowers for the past four years.

The one-acre farm is also a one-woman show, with Cheung doing most of the farming and distillation with some weekend help from some friends. Cheung said she didn’t intend to start a farm, originally hoping to sell the property. However, due to zoning regulations, which only allowed for one house on the property, selling was out of the question, so she started thinking.

“We have this land, we have this house,” she said while sitting inside the modest farm house on the property on a recent morning.

Cheung took a certification course offered by King County designed to educate people how to run small farms, but she was unsure what she should grow. Fruit was out of the question since deer regularly wander onto her property and eat anything they can, including roses. Finally, one of her classmates suggested she try lavender. Following a trip to the Sequim Lavender Festival, she was sold and decided to ultimately purchase 1,500 starts of the iconic purple flowers.

As it turns out, her rocky property was perfect for the flowers, which prefer drier soils than is usually found in the area. Despite wet conditions last year, which killed some flowers, she still has around 1,500. Additionally, the perennial plants are now mature enough to turn into oil, which Cheung has been doing over the last year with a small distiller. Around 1.5 pounds of the flower can be turned into roughly once ounce of oil, which she sells in addition to cut flowers, soap and bags of dried flower shake.

“We make quite a lot of product,” Cheung said.

Cheung grows five varieties of lavender, with the majority beginning to bloom in July in earnest, but a few rows have already started blooming.

Washington state is a destination for lavender lovers, according to the Pacific Horticulture Society. Each year the Lavender Festival in Sequim sees more than 50 acres of the flowers bloom in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. Often thought of as being purple, variants of the plant produce white and pink flowers as well, with a variety of uses such as oils, flavoring for ice cream and beverages and body care products.

Cheung’s Snofalls Lavender Farm is located at 4725 361st Ave. S.E. in Fall City.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Business

Sound Publishing operates the following titles in King County: Federal Way Mirror, Auburn Reporter, Kent-Covington Reporter, Renton Reporter, Enumclaw Courier-Herald, Kirkland Reporter, Bellevue Reporter, Snoqualmie Valley Record, Issaquah Reporter, Redmond Reporter, Bothell-Kenmore Reporter, Mercer Island Reporter and the Vashon-Maury Island Beachcomber.
Snoqualmie Valley Record to suspend print publication

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to rapidly evolve across the globe, the… Continue reading

COVID-19 gathering restriction delays funerals

For one funeral home owner, the confusion came to a head after a recent service.

Courtesy photo. Scott Brittain and his son Ryker at Blake’s Pizzeria in Carnation (before state regulations for COVID-19 mandated restaurants switch to takeout only). Scott has been a customer since he was a kid, and now he and his family are still regulars.
In Carnation, Blake’s carries on with carryout

Community supports local pizzeria during COVID-19 pandemic.

For sale sign hanging in front of house. File photo
Open houses close due to coronavirus concerns

Northwest Multiple Listing Service halts large group home tours amid pandemic.

A Boeing 777X during a taxi test. (Boeing Co.)
Companywide, Boeing reports 11 confirmed cases of COVID-19

Boeing will equip more employees to work remotely, but for now factory workers will stay on the line.

A shot of downtown Kirkland. Samantha St. John of the city’s chamber of commerce said that Kirkland’s business community is likely being more detrimentally affected than others on the Eastside due to the city’s often being deemed the epicenter of the coronavirus epidemic. Blake Peterson/staff photo
‘We’re just kind of in limbo’: Eastside businesses feeling significant economic effects amid coronavirus pandemic

Eastside chamber representatives discuss the states of their business communities.

Bellevue skyline. File photo
Amid coronavirus concerns, Eastside cities are taking preventative steps

Most Eastside cities are following recommendations from county officials.

A flight takes off at SeaTac International Airport. Photo courtesy Port of Seattle
Port of Seattle, airlines respond to COVID-19 with new health measures

Changes at Sea-Tac Airport include more hand sanitizer, training for biohazard cleaning.

With Mount Baker and Jetty Island in the distance, a container ship approaches the Port of Everett. (Port of Everett photo)
Senate Dems: $5 million to help businesses disrupted by coronavirus

Overseas port closures hurt WA companies that depend on international shipping.

Robo investment advice has drawbacks | Business advice column

A monthly business advice column by a Mercer Island financial adviser.

People enjoying the view of Snoqualmie Falls and the Salish Lodge Spa in the sunshine on Feb. 19, 2020. Natalie DeFord/staff photo
Snoqualmie mayor, tribal chairman spar over House bill

HB 2230 would amend tribal property tax exemption.

Resolution time 2020! | PAID CONTENT

Spotlight on Business article.