SVSD supporting families during closures

The district is offering free meals and optional learning opportunities to students.

  • Friday, March 27, 2020 10:24am
  • News
Photo courtesy of Carolyn Malcolm 
                                Snoqualmie Valley School District food services staff hands out meals to students on March 19 at Opstad Elementary. From left, Director Pam Chambers with team members Cheryl Tracy, Barbie Travis, Danielle Wood, Michele McDaniel and Debbie Johnson.

Photo courtesy of Carolyn Malcolm Snoqualmie Valley School District food services staff hands out meals to students on March 19 at Opstad Elementary. From left, Director Pam Chambers with team members Cheryl Tracy, Barbie Travis, Danielle Wood, Michele McDaniel and Debbie Johnson.

With Snoqualmie Valley School District (SVSD) students out of classrooms due to the coronavirus pandemic, the district is making sure kids still have access to essential services, like breakfast and lunch.

“Know that we are committed to supporting families to the best of our abilities and resources,” SVSD superintendent Rob Manahan said. “We understand the important role our schools will continue to play in connecting our community, especially during this time of social distancing.”

The district is handing out free sack lunches and bagged breakfast items to all kids (aged 0-18) and for special education students (as old as 21 years of age). The meals can be picked up curbside between noon and 12:30 p.m., Monday-Friday, at Cascade View Elementary, Fall City Elementary, Opstad Elementary and Snoqualmie Elementary. In order to receive meals, kids must be present.

If a family is unable to travel to one of the pickup locations, they can send an email to chambersp@svsd410.org with their name, number of children, student names and address.

According to an update from the district on March 20, the district had distributed nearly 1,400 free meals in the first three days of the meal program.

“Our entire Food Services staff is to be commended for pulling together this critical service in just a few days, and continuing to serve students who need nutritional support,” SVSD public information officer Carolyn Malcolm said in an email on March 23.

Malcolm said the district’s security team and custodial staff also have been on sight at the pickup locations to ensure everyone’s health and safety.

The district also is partnering with the Helping Hands Weekend Backpack Program to provide groceries for students over the weekends. The Snoqualmie Valley Food Bank also is working to support families by providing dinners for those families.

In a March 20 update, the SVSD announced it will be partnering with local child care providers to “help meet the needs of families serving in critical medical/emergency support roles.”

In order to keep students mentally engaged during the closures, SVSD will provide students with optional learning opportunities.

“Our teaching staff will provide a variety of optional educational activities aligned with relevant grade levels and content areas,” the district wrote in a March 20 update.

For elementary students, teachers will email educational resources. According to SVSD, “the first communication from teachers for grades K-5 is planned for Monday, March 23.”

For middle school and high school students, teachers will be posting weekly learning opportunities on Schoology, beginning on March 24. For more information on using Schoology, go online to the SVSD website (https://www.svsd410.org/Page/8280).

“At this time, all resources and weekly plans are optional for students. They are aligned to state standards and support our curriculum. However, they will not be graded as they are supplementary and not meant to replace instruction,” the district said in its March 20 update.

“The district is also continuing discussions with some local tech companies on ways to offer more robust optional remote learning opportunities, which may include video instruction, and planning for additional training needs of our staff with a focus on staying connected with students,” Malcolm said in an email.

In an update on March 23, the district brought families that receive special education services up to speed on its plans. According to the update, “Special education staff are meeting this week to collaborate and think creatively about how to provide resources and optional education-related activities that are appropriate for our students.”

Teachers and support staff will reach out to families to discuss the support needed for those students.


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