Sip Suds and Si returns to North Bend with wine, beer, art and live music. Photo courtesy of North Bend Downtown Foundation‎.

Sip Suds and Si returns to North Bend with wine, beer, art and live music. Photo courtesy of North Bend Downtown Foundation‎.

Sip Suds and Si returns to North Bend

The North Bend Downtown Foundation is partnering with wineries, breweries, artists and musicians for the second Sip Suds and Si.

The North Bend Downtown Foundation will host its second Sip Suds and Si art walk on March 30. Riding the success of the inaugural Sip Suds and Si event from last October, Debra Landers, a North Bend Downtown Foundation board member and main planner of the event, said the foundation “feels good” about hosting its second event.

“We had over 500 people at the first one, which far exceeded our expectations,” she said.

Landers said she and the foundation observed how surrounding cities organized their art and wine walks and wanted to do something similar for North Bend.

“We saw how these kinds of events have a positive impact on the local merchants and the community as a whole,” she said.

For the second Sip Suds and Si event, the North Bend Downtown Foundation is partnering with 13 wineries, three breweries and two cideries. Some of the beer and wine will be provided by Lost Giants Cider, William Grassie Wine Estates, Market Vineyards, Mount Si Winery, Le Bec Fin, Gregarious Cellars, No Boat Brewing Company, Snoqualmie Falls Brewery, Dru Bru, Bunnell Family Cellar, Zerba Cellars, Sky River Mead & Wine, Tertulia Cellars Woodinville Tasting Room, DiStefano Winery, Orenda Winery, Tricycle Cellars and Glacier View Cellars.

Sip Suds and Si is designed to be art and community focused.

“We’ll have about three musical groups performing, as well as various street musicians,” Landers said. “We’ll have historic downtown covered with local artists creating art and local merchants hosting the wine and beer tastings.”

One of the main music groups that will be returning to Sip Suds and Si is Tinkham Road. Tinkham Road is a collective of musicians performing historical music of the Snoqualmie Valley and the Pacific Northwest. From logging ballads to railroad tunes and original music inspired by the local landscape, Tinkham Road plays an eclectic mix of old and new. Members include Jeremy Rule on cello, Ryan Donnelly on upright bass, Gavin Treglown on guitar, Bob Antone on violin and guitar, Parker Antone on banjo, violin and musical saw, and Chase Rabideau-Hannah on guitar and voice.

In preparing for the second Sip Suds and Si, Landers said it’s become easier.

“We’ve been through it once so we’ve worked out some of the initial kinks. It’s been great to see people getting excited about it and wanting to come back because they had so much fun the first time,” she said. “It’s such a great way to support local merchants, artists and the community.”

The second Sip Suds and Si will be held on March 30 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and begins at the historic Train Depot, located at 205 McClellan Street. Tickets are $20 pre-sale, $25 day of the event. Tickets and information can be found online at https://bit.ly/2Hfhned.

Tinkham Road will be performing again at the second Sip Suds and Si event on March 30. From left: Chase Rabideau Hannah, Ryan Donnelly, Brian Lawrence, Jeremy Rule and Bob Antone. Photo by Photographers Northwest.

Tinkham Road will be performing again at the second Sip Suds and Si event on March 30. From left: Chase Rabideau Hannah, Ryan Donnelly, Brian Lawrence, Jeremy Rule and Bob Antone. Photo by Photographers Northwest.

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