File photo of the North Bend City Council. Pictured from left: King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert, North Bend council members Mary Miller, Chris Garcia, Ross Loudenback, Mayor Pro Tem Brenden Elwood, North Bend Mayor Rob McFarland, council members Alan Gothelf and Heather Koellen.

File photo of the North Bend City Council. Pictured from left: King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert, North Bend council members Mary Miller, Chris Garcia, Ross Loudenback, Mayor Pro Tem Brenden Elwood, North Bend Mayor Rob McFarland, council members Alan Gothelf and Heather Koellen.

North Bend considers summer water use restrictions

They could impact everything from car washing to table water at restaurants.

North Bend is considering enacting water conservation measures to help reduce use during peak demand months. The ordinance would apply to all customers in the city, including those on city water and those served by the Sallal Water Association.

It lays out a number of restrictions on water use. They would be enforced by a scaling response from the city, and city customers could face up to $100 a day in fines for noncompliance. Water service could also be shut off for violators.

Water conservation would be implemented in stages. The first would automatically occur on Aug. 15 of each year. Water runoff from a customer’s property to adjoining property, including onto roads or ditches, would be prohibited. Further, all hoses are required to have automatic shut-off devices for all uses like watering lawns, washing cars or watering animal troughs.

All pools, spas and fountains must have recirculating pumps and be leak proof. Pools will only be drained and refilled for health or maintenance reasons.

However, residents can water their lawns at any time of day.

The second stage kicks in when water levels at the city’s reserve reach a certain level to be determined by the city. On top of the previous restrictions, it limits most landscape and pasture irrigation to a maximum of three days per week. Drip irrigation will be allowed on any day. Residents with odd numbered street addresses will irrigate on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays while those with even address will irrigate on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays.

Additionally, washing of streets, driveways, sidewalks and other similar surfaces are prohibited, other than for health, sanitation or fire protection.

Under this tier, restaurants will only serve water when requested.

The third and final tier is the most restrictive. It would allow watering laws and irrigation on one day a week. No city water would be used to drain or refill pools, artificial ponds or streams and no new permits would be issued for these uses.

Residents would be required to wash cars or equipment on a lawn or at a car wash that uses recycled or reclaimed water.

The ordinance underwent a first reading at the May 5 North Bend City Council meeting, and if approved at a future date, could go into effect this summer.

North Bend has struggled in recent years to meet the conditions imposed by the state for Centennial Well, it’s newest and largest. While the well can supply enough water for the city, it is required to have a secondary mitigation source. This is used to pump water back into the Snoqualmie River – where Centennial Well draws from – during dry times of the year.

This backup supply would come from the Sallal Water District, a neighboring utility that has wells south of the city. Sallal’s water comes in part from a portion of Chester Morse lake known as the Masonry Pool. When levels in this pool hit certain levels, during August, September and October, it would trigger the conservation levels outlined in North Bend’s ordinance.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

King County could be in Phase 2 in two weeks

The county is also hoping the state lets them reopen several businesses by Friday.

Protesters gathered in downtown Snoqualmie on May 30 to voice their opposition to police violence against people of color. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Snoqualmie holds peaceful police violence protest

The protest attracted around two dozen people who held signs in downtown Snoqualmie.

File photo
Rates of COVID-19 lower in the Valley

East King County has lower rates than much of the rest of the county.

Kabal Gill, owner of East India Grill in Federal Way, wears gloves to hand over take-out orders at his restaurant on March 23. File photo
New guidelines for Phase 2 reopenings in King County

All workers will need to wear masks as restaurants, retail shops and other businesses reopen.

This undated file photo provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows CDC’s laboratory test kit for the new coronavirus. Courtesy photo
Inslee wants nursing home residents and staff tested by June 12

Governor says state will pay for test kits and personal protective equipment.

Stock image
Campgrounds to reopen in 22 Washington counties

Campgrounds in counties actively in Phase 2 of the reopening plan will begin to welcome visitors June 1, state says.

King County Sheriff Mitzi Johanknecht. FILE PHOTO
King County sheriff releases message about Minneapolis Police officer

Mitzi Johanknecht calls video of officer kneeling on neck of George Floyd ‘heartbreaking and disturbing’

File photo of construction near North Bend on Aug. 16. Sound Publishing file photo
                                File photo of construction near North Bend on Aug. 16. Sound Publishing file photo
Rural King County mayors want state to let them enter Phase 2

Mayors cite heavy economic damage from prolonged shutdown.

Most Read