Encompass capital campaign leadership at the property site for Encompass Snoqualmie. From left: Major Gifts Officer, Rhonda Ender, Director of Development, Lisa Yamasaki, Executive Director, Nela Cumming, and Campaign Steering Committee Co-Chairs Brad Hutt and Charlotte Rempfer. Courtesy photo

Encompass capital campaign leadership at the property site for Encompass Snoqualmie. From left: Major Gifts Officer, Rhonda Ender, Director of Development, Lisa Yamasaki, Executive Director, Nela Cumming, and Campaign Steering Committee Co-Chairs Brad Hutt and Charlotte Rempfer. Courtesy photo

Encompass secures state funds for new Snoqualmie facility

Encompass will be breaking ground for the new facility in Spring of 2020.

Encompass, a longtime Valley early learning nonprofit, is closer to making the concept of a new facility in Snoqualmie a reality.

Encompass is one of the few organizations to provide early learning, pediatric therapy and family enrichment programs for children ages 0-8 and their families on the Eastside.

With two locations in North Bend and one in Carnation — and a host of programs offered at community locations and in the home — Encompass supports children and families across the Snoqualmie Valley and greater Eastside.

The organization is planning to construct a facility for its child care services on the honey farm property (located on the corner of 384th Avenue Southeast and Southeast Kimball Creek Drive in Snoqualmie) it purchased in 2017.

Nela Cumming, executive director of Encompass, said the organization has been struggling with the growth of the population in the Valley and the expansion of programs while still in its current North Bend location. Based out of an early learning center in North Bend, Encompass also rents space for a pediatric clinic in the city and runs a preschool in Carnation. The new facility would be the organization’s first location in Snoqualmie.

“Our community is growing. We have new families coming to the area every year and we really have a responsibility to step up and meet the needs of the kids and their families,” Cumming said. “We are in need of a new space and the North Bend facility isn’t really designed to be a clinic.”

With the new facility in Snoqualmie, Cumming said Encompass will be able to increase the number of children served by 30 percent, create space for 36 additional children to attend half-day preschool, double the capacity of behavioral health programs like parent-child interaction therapy, and offer new therapeutic programs.

“Our children are our most important asset, and as the population of the Snoqualmie Valley has increased dramatically, the need for additional space is obvious,” Dave Battey, Upper Snoqualmie Valley historian, said in a statement. “I am very proud of our Encompass team, and am excited to see their strong local focus grow.”

The goal is to raise $8.3 million for the new facility. The Washington State Legislature recently voted to approve the budget for the 2020 fiscal year. Encompass’s Snoqualmie facility received $2 million in state funding.

“The money from the State of Washington will be absolutely instrumental to reaching our fundraising goals for Encompass Snoqualmie,” Cumming said. “We are so thankful to Representatives Lisa Callan, Mark Mullet, and Bill Ramos for championing our vision to the Washington Legislature. This funding gets us much closer to making Encompass Snoqualmie a reality.”

Encompass will be launching the public phase of their capital campaign later this summer and will be asking for community support at that time.

“We’ve received such tremendous support and people are so excited for this,” Cumming said. “We need everyone’s help to make this a reality.”


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A conceptual rendering of a classroom space at the new Encompass facility. Created by Signal Architecture + Research

A conceptual rendering of a classroom space at the new Encompass facility. Created by Signal Architecture + Research

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