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Snoqualmie's 100-foot Tokul Creek Trestle still draws travelers | Photo Gallery

The Tokul Creek Trestle, near Snoqualmie, is part of the Snoqualmie Valley Trail, and a favorite stop for bicyclists and hikers. The 100 year-old bridge was used by freight trains into the early 70s, before the Milwaukee Railroad abandoned the line.   - Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo
  • Oct 17, 2014 at 11:37AM

Everyone stops on the Tokul Creek bridge. It’s not that they need to; the Snoqualmie Valley Trail rises very gently up the Valley, and the bridge is about a mile along it from Tokul Road. Whether they’re on two wheels or two feet, though, the people who explore the trail as far as the 100-year-old Milwaukee Railroad trestle bridge seem compelled to pause there, and take in the view.

 

Community Events, October 2014

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Valley host families needed for middle schoolers from Peru, Korea | 3-week stay

  • Oct 20, 2014 at 10:01AM

For the seventh year, Korean middle school students will be traveling from Snoqualmie’s sister city of Gangjin to study in at our local schools and experience home stays in American homes. Students will be traveling from Snoqualmie’s second sister city of Chaclacayo, Peru with the same spirit of adventure and goal of learning about U.S. culture.

Valley cops find man with no pants, bushwhacking for lost wallet

  • Oct 17, 2014 at 1:54PM

Bushwhacking: On Wednesday, Oct. 8, a caller reported to Snoqualmie Police that a man and woman were thrashing through some brush in the area of Pickett Avenue Northeast and Northeast Eighth Street in North Bend, and that at one point, the man was not wearing any pants. The man left to put pants on and the woman continued to hack at the brush with a machete. Police contacted the couple and found out they were searching the bushes for his lost wallet.

More than a century of life continues for Snoqualmie's Carmichael’s hardware store

  • Oct 16, 2014 at 3:27PM

For Wendy Thomas, running Carmichael’s True Value Hardware Store is never boring. Every day, someone walks in with a new challenge to fix. Visitors pace the wooden boards of the store, discovering something useful, humorous, sometimes timeless. “I feel like I’m preserving an ancient tradition,” she says.

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Secrets of Fall City history: Go behind the scenes, learn about unusual finds at annual meeting

  • Oct 15, 2014 at 4:11PM

The wool uniform is surprisingly heavy, and in fine condition, considering it’s a century old. Now cared for by Ruth Pickering, the suit’s original owner was Jesse Kelley of Fall City. Jesse donned the heavy shirt and laced on the puttees after he was drafted into the Great War in 1917. He probably wore it during his 1918 service on the Western Front in a balloon company, just before World War I came to a close.

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