Courtesy photo
                                Compass Outdoor Adventures and SnoValley Chamber of Commerce hope the Search for Sasquatch scavenger hunt will become an annual event.

Courtesy photo Compass Outdoor Adventures and SnoValley Chamber of Commerce hope the Search for Sasquatch scavenger hunt will become an annual event.

Valley-wide search for Sasquatch kicks off Saturday

Compass Outdoor Adventures and SnoValley Chamber of Commerce to present first annual Search for Sasquatch scavenger hunt on Aug. 10.

It goes by many names: Sasquatch, Bigfoot, Yowie, Skunk Ape, and Yayali—to name a few. Sasquatch has become a popular local legend in the Pacific Northwest and beyond.

With more than 600 sightings in Washington — the most anywhere in North America — many believe the PNW is the Sasquatch’s home.

The SnoValley Chamber of Commerce is partnering with Compass Outdoor Adventures to offer locals and visitors a chance to come together to find Sasquatch in its inaugural Search for Sasquatch scavenger hunt.

SnoValley Chamber of Commerce executive director Kelly Coughlin said the event is meant to bring family, friends and neighbors together to enjoy the beauty of the Valley.

“It’s going to be a great way for friends, family and visitors to get out and see more of the area,” she said. “It’s going to be fun for all ages.”

The scavenger hunt will begin at noon on Aug. 10 at Centennial Park and will conclude at an undisclosed location at 4 p.m.

The scavenger hunt will guide participants all throughout the Valley—Snoqualmie, North Bend and Fall City.

Participants will go to sighting spots. They will collect evidence and enjoy Sasquatch pastimes trying to lure it out of hiding for a day of fun and adventure.

Compass Outdoor Adventures will guide people to each destination and has provided clues to where to find all the scavenger hunt items.

Compass Outdoor Adventures specializes in getting people outside, active and engaged with their surroundings. Compass Outdoor Adventures offers mountain bike rentals as well as guided tours of some of the PNW’s greatest trails.

Caley George, Compass Outdoor Adventures director of marketing, said it is the first Sasquatch-related event they have ever done.

“We’re really looking forward to it,” he said. “We’re Sasquatch enthusiasts, and we’re looking forward to getting people out to explore the area and have fun.”

Between Compass Outdoor Adventures and SnoValley Chamber of Commerce, the event has been in the works for a few months. George said it’s been fun and challenging designing the scavenger hunt in order to take participants to places they may have never been to before.

“I think something like this is important to have because a lot of people work and don’t have a lot of opportunities to get out and see around them,” Coughlin said. “This is just our way of helping bring people together to do something fun.”

In teams, people will solve critical missions, find hidden lairs and explore local stories about Sasquatch.

With an app, teams will document their sightings and findings throughout the scavenger hunt.

“They will capture photos and video evidence,” George said. “It could be something like high-fiving a cop, visiting a specific spot, among other things.”

The more items teams complete, the more points they earn. The top three teams will receive prizes. The finale will take place at an undisclosed, secret location where there will be post adventure beverages by Snoqualmie Brewery and light snacks provided by the Iron Duck.

Payment for participating in the Snoqualmie Valley adventure is $25 per person, $80 for a team of four, or $80 for a family.

To learn more about the Search for Sasquatch scavenger hunt, go online to the event’s website (https://bit.ly/2KivRub).


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

King County could be in Phase 2 in two weeks

The county is also hoping the state lets them reopen several businesses by Friday.

Protesters gathered in downtown Snoqualmie on May 30 to voice their opposition to police violence against people of color. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Snoqualmie holds peaceful police violence protest

The protest attracted around two dozen people who held signs in downtown Snoqualmie.

File photo
Rates of COVID-19 lower in the Valley

East King County has lower rates than much of the rest of the county.

Kabal Gill, owner of East India Grill in Federal Way, wears gloves to hand over take-out orders at his restaurant on March 23. File photo
New guidelines for Phase 2 reopenings in King County

All workers will need to wear masks as restaurants, retail shops and other businesses reopen.

This undated file photo provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows CDC’s laboratory test kit for the new coronavirus. Courtesy photo
Inslee wants nursing home residents and staff tested by June 12

Governor says state will pay for test kits and personal protective equipment.

Stock image
Campgrounds to reopen in 22 Washington counties

Campgrounds in counties actively in Phase 2 of the reopening plan will begin to welcome visitors June 1, state says.

King County Sheriff Mitzi Johanknecht. FILE PHOTO
King County sheriff releases message about Minneapolis Police officer

Mitzi Johanknecht calls video of officer kneeling on neck of George Floyd ‘heartbreaking and disturbing’

File photo of construction near North Bend on Aug. 16. Sound Publishing file photo
                                File photo of construction near North Bend on Aug. 16. Sound Publishing file photo
Rural King County mayors want state to let them enter Phase 2

Mayors cite heavy economic damage from prolonged shutdown.

Most Read