Women in pink hats march in Seattle in 2017. (File Photo)

Women in pink hats march in Seattle in 2017. (File Photo)

Snoqualmie Valley, Eastside sign up for Women’s March 2.0

  • Tuesday, January 16, 2018 10:51am
  • News

Activists in the Seattle area are organizing a second march, in the spirit of the Jan. 21, 2017, Seattle Womxn’s March (the “x” represents the intersection and overlapping of many forms of discrimination). The Seattle Women’s March 2.0 starts at 10 a.m. at Cal Anderson Park on Capitol Hill in Seattle, Saturday, Jan. 20 and Eastside participants have organized bus transportation for those interested in participating again.

The Snoqualmie Valley bus, leaving the Duvall Park and Ride at 9 a.m. Saturday, is booked up with 31 riders, but organizer Lisa Tario has created a waitlist. If enough people join the waitlist, she hopes to charter a larger bus. To sign up, visit http://www.signupgenius.com/go/409044eacab2aa0fa7-2018.

For those coming from Issaquah, buses will leave from the South Sammamish Park and Ride, located at 3015 228th Ave. SE, Sammamish, and the Issaquah Transit Center, located at 1464 Newport Way NW, Issaquah, at 8 a.m. To learn more or sign up, visit the Plateaupians for Peace Facebook page or send email to plateaupians@gmail.com.

The activism continues Sunday, Jan. 21, with Womxn ACT on Seattle, a citywide day of learning, supporting, sharing, and acting on behalf of nonprofit organizations, grassroots and social justice groups in Seattle .

Events include food and clothing drives, lectures and film screenings in the Seattle area, as well as on the Central Washington University campus in Sammamish, the Crossroads mall in Bellevue and the Muslim Association of Puget Sound in Redmond.

For the full schedule of events, visit http://www.seattlewomxnmarchingforward.org.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Brian Tilley (left) and Katie Dearman work the wash station Friday at Kate’s Greek American Deli in Everett. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Governor’s no-mask, no-service order begins across Washington

“Just do not ring up the sale,” Gov. Jay Inslee said about customers who do not don the proper masks.

King County homeless count: 11,751 people, up 5 percent from 2019

One night a year, volunteers spread out across Seattle and King County… Continue reading

A look at COVID-related unemployment in Snoqualmie Valley

Economist says numbers are similar to what they’re seeing across the state.

Nurse Sylvia Keller, pictured with Gov. Jay Inslee, is on the front lines of the COVID-19 battle in Yakima County. Courtesy photo
Governor doubles down on mask rules

Inslee: Starting July 7, businesses do not serve those who do not wear a mask

State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Politicians get pay raises, state workers get furloughs

A citizens panel approved the hikes in 2019. Unable to rescind them, lawmakers look to donate their extra earnings.

Human remains in West Seattle identified

Bags of body parts were found in a suitcase along a West Seattle beach on June 19.

Stock photo
Eastside burn ban implemented June 15

The ban will be effective through Sept. 30.

Courtesy of the SnoValley Chamber of Commerce Facebook page.
Annual count shows uptick in homelessness in Snoqualmie Valley

More people are living unsheltered in the valley.

According to King County’s Mental Illness and Drug Dependency (MIDD) annual report, Seattle had the highest rate of people using services at 36 percent of the total, followed by 31 percent from South King County, 18 percent from the greater Eastside, and 7 percent from north county including Shoreline. Courtesy image
Drug courts, officer de-escalation programs impacted by MIDD cuts

The fund provides money for mental illness and drug dependency programs across King County.

Most Read