Snoqualmie mayor tests positive for COVID-19

Snoqualmie mayor tests positive for COVID-19

Mayor Larson is recovering and isolating at home; city continuing to take preventative measures.

  • Monday, March 23, 2020 7:58am
  • News

Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson has tested positive for COVID-19.

The mayor was tested for COVID-19 on March 16 at Snoqualmie Valley Hospital after showing symptoms of the illness including a fever and cough. On March 22, he received results that he tested positive.

After 10 days in self-isolation at his home, Larson is recovering, according to a city press release, and plans to continue to self-isolate until all symptoms have passed. His family also self-isolated, the press release stated.

Mayor Larson was not at work when his symptoms first occurred, however City Hall will be disinfected.

“I do not know anyone with COVID-19, and do not know where I contracted the illness,” Larson said. “My positive test results underscore that this is an invisible threat. I cannot stress enough the importance of our community sheltering at home at this time.

“I am fortunate to be healthy and have staved off the serious repercussions that could have required hospitalization, but many have a higher-risk of becoming more seriously ill. There are many youth in the community who are not practicing social distancing and gathering in large groups putting vulnerable populations at risk. I implore parents to explain the risks to their kids – both for themselves and others – and keep them home until the public health agencies deem the risk has decreased,” Larson added.

Following health protocols, Mayor Larson and all members of his household plan to follow the physician’s order prior to coming out of quarantine.

“The city administration, city council, and city staff need to take the utmost protection for themselves and their families, as well as the residents they serve in Snoqualmie,” Larson said. “City Hall employees and all non-essential city staff are scheduled to begin telecommuting on March 23. We have closed the playgrounds due to the challenge of disinfecting every surface and to encourage social distancing. This week we will be evaluating further measures to keep our citizens and city employees safe.”

A public hotline has been set up by the Department of Health for individuals seeking information about COVID-19 and their personal situation: 1-800-525-0127.




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