Flood Prevention checklists for your home and your business

Get ready for possible floods this winter with the National Flood Insurance Program’s business and home checklist. Flooding is one of the most common natural phenomena across the country and can be devastating, but proper preparation and smart planning can help to prevent damage to your home or business.

  • Tuesday, November 1, 2016 4:40pm
  • News

Get ready for possible floods this winter with the National Flood Insurance Program’s business and home checklist. Flooding is one of the most common natural phenomena across the country and can be devastating, but proper preparation and smart planning can help to prevent damage to your home or business.

For more information visit FloodSmart.gov.

Before a flood

Here are steps you can take to ensure safety and simplify claims:

Take photos of your home and business as it is now;

Develop an evacuation plan with your family and employees;

Have a list of important phone numbers and sandbag locations;

Teach everyone how and when to shut off gas, electric and water;

Review your flood insurance declaration page.

After a flood

Make sure your home is safe before entering;

Take photos of the damage, inside and out;

File your flood claim. Ask if you can begin clean-up immediately;

•Separate undamaged items;

Keep an inventory of all damaged items, age and value, regardless of their coverage;

Keep samples of carpets and flooring removed from each room;

Keep estimates from contractors to show to your adjustor and provide receipts from prior claims.

Keep receipts for everything

Sign the proof of loss within 60 days of the date of loss. Supplemental claims can address discrepancies

Learn more at FloodSmart.gov/floodsmart/pages/preparation_recovery/file_your_claim.jsp.

Protecting your business

Review your insurance policies to see if coverage is provided for flood damage to the building and its contents. Contents coverage typically is optional.

If you have a lease, review it to see if the building’s flood insurance policy covers structural elements in your space. Most commercial insurance does not cover flood damage.

Review equipment lease and rental agreements to determine if you are responsible for flood damage.

Ensure that important business files are backed up on a server away from your building so they aren’t lost if electronics and paper files are destroyed.

Keep detailed records of all items in the building, including serial numbers, costs, and dates of purchase. Store those records on a remote server or in another place you can access after a flood to aid in the claims process.

Establish a disaster procedure and emergency communications plan to share with your employees.

Create a wallet-size contact card with important names and number, in case of emergency.

Set up a phone or text message tree with your staff.

Tune in to local media and community messaging about potential disasters.

Protecting your home

Review your current insurance policies to see if coverage is provided for flood damage to your home and its contents.

Most homeowners insurance does not cover flood damage, so be sure to purchase flood insurance to cover both your property and contents.

To find an agent who sells flood insurance in your area, use the Agent Locator at FloodSmart.gov/floodsmart/pages/choose_your_policy/agent_locator.jsp or call 800-427-2419.

Ensure that medical and financial records—including your insurance policy— are in a waterproof container and store additional copies in a separate secure location.

Create a contact card small enough to put in a wallet with important names and numbers to use in case of an emergency.

Establish a disaster procedure and family communications plan to share with your family members at Ready.gov/make-a-plan.

Tune in to local media and community messaging about potential disasters.

Visit FloodSmart.gov for more resources and information.

 


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