The Hjertoos House, built in 1907, the the new location for the Tolt Historical Society. The volunteer-based group hopes to officially open in Spring 2019. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The Hjertoos House, built in 1907, the the new location for the Tolt Historical Society. The volunteer-based group hopes to officially open in Spring 2019. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Tolt Historical Soceity moves to new location, prepares for museum opening in 2019

The Tolt Historical Society has moved to the Hjertoos House and plans to open to the public in 2019.

After years of collecting and preserving the history of Carnation and the surrounding Valley, the Tolt Historical Society has moved into a new location and is preparing to open its doors to the public.

Formed in 1982, the Tolt Historical Society has worked to preserve as much of the history of the area as possible. Originally located at the Sno-Valley Senior Center, the historical society moved its collection displays into a barn at Carnation Farms in 2008. due to anticipated changes at Carnation Farms, the historical society has made the move to the historic Hjertoos House, a King County Historical Landmark.

Historical Society member Jackie Norris said The Hjertoos House was built in 1907 by historical society member Rogers Thorson’s great grandfather. Thorson, who owns the Carnation Tree Farm and the house, offered to host the museum as the new location when the search began.

Over the course of the last year, historical society members have been working to properly package and transfer the collection of artifacts to the new location. Jackie Norris, a member of the historical society, said the museum began packing in January and transferred most of the collection to the house in July. Since then, they have been working on setting up cabinets, organizing documents and files, and preparing to open the first floor of the house as a museum where the public can look at several pieces from the collection.

To prepare for the move, hundreds of items were systematically numbered and labeled. King County cultural funding agency 4Culture hired interns from the University of Washington’s Museology graduate program to help with physical inventory and research. Their help on location during the move made the process significantly easier, Norris said.

The historical society expects the Hjertoos House to be officially open in the spring of 2019.

Norris said the new location makes the historical society much more visible in the community as they are next to the Tolt McDonald Park and the tree farm. The historical society is excited to continue its work in the city.

“People like to talk about their history and families, see an artifact and it reminds them of home,” Norris said. “There is something about history that gives us depth, that gives us roots, that gives us comfort, that kind of completes us. (Visitors) love to show it to their children and love to say ‘this is what I had, this is what I played with when I was little.’”


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

Tolt Historical Society member Jackie Norris explains the history behind the 1938 painting “Snoqualmie Valley Industries” by Beryl Adair Trezise. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Tolt Historical Society member Jackie Norris explains the history behind the 1938 painting “Snoqualmie Valley Industries” by Beryl Adair Trezise. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Jackie Norris stands with the miniature replica of the Vincent Schoolhouse made by William Quaale. The schoolhouse was built in 1905 and closed in 1942. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Jackie Norris stands with the miniature replica of the Vincent Schoolhouse made by William Quaale. The schoolhouse was built in 1905 and closed in 1942. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

More in Life

Margery and Pat Godfrey. Olivia Sullivan/the Mirror
Couple’s love story inspires new Hallmark Channel movie

Inspired by local residents Pat and Margery Godfrey is the story “A Godwink Christmas - Second Chance, First Love”

Deception Pass State Park. Deception Pass is a strait separating Whidbey Island from Fidalgo Island. File photo
Free Park Days in 2021 start in January

The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission will again offer 12 free… Continue reading

2020 Ford Ranger SuperCrew Lariat. Courtesy photo
2020 Ford Ranger SuperCrew Lariat | Car review

Ford’s venerable compact Ranger pickup went away for a while. But it… Continue reading

Courtesy photo
Sign up for 2020 ‘Run to Rwanda’ Fun Run slated for September

Clyde Hill resident Sophie Sharp, an 11th grade student at The Overlake… Continue reading

Washington State Fair cancelled
Washington State Fair cancelled

COVID-19 outbreak claims another event

TLG Motion Pictures CEO Erik Bernard and TLG founder Courtney LeMarco on a set. Photo courtesy TLG Motion Pictures.
Local production company seeking film, TV pitches from young minority creatives

The Big Pitch competition, put on by TLG Motion Pictures (“Hoarders”), started about six months ago.

Local musicians hold virtual benefit concert for mental health
Local musicians hold virtual benefit concert for mental health

The stream-a-thon supports NAMI Eastside and nonprofit Hold Your Crown

Waste reduction from home
Waste reduction from home

A monthly column from Waste Management.

Medic One Foundation’s Gratitude Meals offer support to first responders, local businesses
Medic One Foundation’s Gratitude Meals offer support to first responders, local businesses

The initiative provides hearty lunches to first responders staffing the COVID-19 testing sites as they work to test their colleagues.

UW students create Spira app to gather COVID-19 data
UW students create Spira app to gather COVID-19 data

The app was created to screen for respiratory diseases but the teen creators shifted their focus once the COVID-19 outbreak began.

KCLS is stepping up its commitment to patrons
KCLS is stepping up its commitment to patrons

A monthly column about the King County Library System.

Earth Month 2020 and COVID-19
Earth Month 2020 and COVID-19

A Waste Management column about caring for the planet and each other.