Stacey Anderson originally wanted to run a Sweet Treats food truck, but the space allowed for a small storefront where she now sells cookie dough by the scoop, along with other treats. Courtesy photo

Stacey Anderson originally wanted to run a Sweet Treats food truck, but the space allowed for a small storefront where she now sells cookie dough by the scoop, along with other treats. Courtesy photo

Sweet Treats feeds a desire for cookie dough

The local vendor and catering service offers safe-to-eat cookie dough on the Eastside.

There is a recurring moment in the cookie-making process when a common thought occurs: Why not just eat the dough now and skip all the baking and waiting?

For some, the raw dough is better than a fresh cookie, making it a uniquely optional baked treat. Snoqualmie’s Stacey Anderson wanted to feed that desire for mushy, uncooked dough and delivers it with her business, Sweet Treats, a new cookie dough vendor and catering service on the Eastside.

“I knew in my gut that this was a good idea,” Anderson said. “I know this is a successful business waiting to happen, so why not start it myself.”

The dough is safe to eat, made with an egg substitute and heat-treated flour, and can be cooked at home for those who prefer a baked cookie.

Edible cookie dough as a business originated on the East Coast and has been popping up in major cities throughout the United States, including Seattle. While these businesses offer edible cookie dough on the side, Sweet Treats is the first stand-alone cookie dough shop in the Seattle area.

Stacey Anderson originally wanted to run a Sweet Treats food truck, but the space allowed for a small storefront where she now sells cookie dough by the scoop, along with other treats. Courtesy photo

Stacey Anderson originally wanted to run a Sweet Treats food truck, but the space allowed for a small storefront where she now sells cookie dough by the scoop, along with other treats. Courtesy photo

While Sweet Treats uses peanut butter for some of its flavors, Anderson made a distinct effort to offer vegan, dairy-free and gluten free options for any kid to enjoy.

“We’re the only of all those guys who do any allergy-friendly [flavors],” Anderson said. “My family has allergies and restrictions so it was really important to me that kids who have allergies could have a treat.”

Anderson was inspired by the East Coast cookie dough movement and her own family’s love for the raw dessert. Her shop is located at 8125 Falls Avenue Southeast in Snoqualmie and caters to most Eastside cities.

Anderson added that she eventually wants to take Sweet Treats mobile and establish an Eastside food truck for the businesses, similar to Seattle’s Sugar + Spoon, a widely successful cookie dough food truck. Currently, she’s working to get the permits rolling and establish a mobile service as soon as possible.

“This is a very kid-friendly, family-friendly community and we’re a friendly store,” Anderson said. “To be able to cater to different events [people] have is a really great way to integrate myself into the community.”

The food truck and catering service were Anderson’s initial vision as Sweet Treat’s primary business, but when Anderson found a space to work out of, there was barely enough room for a storefront.

“We try to make it as fun as possible for the space we have … I’m really happy we have lots of return customers,” Anderson said. “The big thing to me is that they enjoy the flavors. One girl said, ‘This might be the best thing I’ve ever had,’ and that really warms my heart.”

Sweet Treats currently offers six cookie dough flavors by the scoop, with more on the way, alongside other unique treats including Oreos stuffed with cookie dough and homemade “krispy treats” topped with cookie dough, chocolate and sprinkles.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The name of the store was incorrect in the printed headline. The correction has been made to the online version of the story. This story also removed an inaccurate paragraph about the store’s employees. The store has four employees. A redundant quote was fixed.


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While Sweet Treats focuses on cookie dough, the storefront also offers a variety of treats, such as this krispy treat topped with cookie dough, chocolate and sprinkles. Courtesy photo

While Sweet Treats focuses on cookie dough, the storefront also offers a variety of treats, such as this krispy treat topped with cookie dough, chocolate and sprinkles. Courtesy photo

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