Pappas says farewell to the Record | Column

Departing reporter Evan Pappas recounts his time at the Record.

When I first started at the Valley Record in 2015, I thought the Valley’s natural beauty was its best asset. Now I know it’s not the environment but the people who call the Valley home.

Today, July 26, is my last day at the Valley Record as I have accepted a new job closer to home. But while I may be leaving, the Snoqualmie Valley will never leave me. The people I’ve met and the stories I’ve written have helped shape my perspective on so many aspects of life.

My work at the Valley Record started right after I graduated from college, and it was instrumental in crafting the type of storyteller I am today. Thankfully, the Valley was full of people eager to share their stories, perspectives and plans for the future.

From the local businesses to the various plans to promote tourism across North Bend and Snoqualmie, the construction of brand new schools, or the more personal stories of residents overcoming adversity or bringing light to ongoing issues, the people have always been the center of my focus.

The best part of being a reporter based in historic downtown Snoqualmie were the people I met and places I would go. I’ve been to a Carnation farm learning about drainage restoration, I’ve been inside local businesses teaching students about possible job pathways, and I’ve been on the South Fork of the Snoqualmie River to cover the illegal dumping of trash. Every day was something different, and I learned so much about every aspect of the community.

Thank you to every reader who has ever picked up our paper or read our stories online. It’s your engagement and feedback that drives us to be the best we can be. I also wanted to thank the many people that have worked with me, opened their schedules, and welcomed me into their homes to share their stories.

My coworkers, the people who have guided my journey as a reporter, have been an invaluable part of the Valley Record. Thank you to Carol Ladwig, David Hamilton, Bill Shaw and Wendy Fried for being kind, funny and motivating during our time working together.

I also wanted to thank the current lineup of reporters, Aaron Kunkler, Madison Miller, Stephanie Quiroz, Ashley Hiruko, Madeline Coats and Corey Oldenhuis. This is an extremely talented group and I know they provide their best for the Eastside cities.

Much like Carol before me, I would like to request one thing from you. We work for the readers and our purpose is to tell your stories, so advocate for your ideas, tips, and letters. Call us (425-888-2311) or send an email to editor@valleyrecord.com and let us know what is essential and what needs to be covered.

I am leaving, but I know the staff here at Sound Publishing will still be dedicated to serving the community with relevant local news every week.

Thanks again, Valley — I’ll never forget my time here.

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