State DNR to kick off recreation planning for the Snoqualmie corridor

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is planning for the future of recreation on 53,000 acres of state trust lands and natural areas in and around the Valley. DNR is inviting the public to an open house, 7 to 9 p.m., Wednesday, January 18, at Snoqualmie Middle School, to kick off the planning process and get feedback from citizens.

  • Wednesday, January 4, 2012 8:34pm
  • News

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is planning for the future of recreation on 53,000 acres of state trust lands and natural areas in and around the Valley.

DNR is inviting the public to an open house, 7 to 9 p.m., Wednesday, January 18, at Snoqualmie Middle School, to kick off the planning process and get feedback from citizens.

The Snoqualmie corridor, located in eastern King County, offers opportunities for outdoor recreation near the ever-growing Seattle metropolitan area. In the past 20 years, DNR has increased the amount of land it manages in the corridor. Some are state trust lands—working forests; other lands form the largest network of natural areas in the state.

The 53,000-acre planning area includes two newer DNR-managed properties: the Raging River State Forest, purchased in 2009 to replace state trust lands previously transferred out of trust status, and the Middle Fork Snoqualmie Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA), which was designated in 2009 by Peter Goldmark, Commissioner of Public Lands.

The first part of the open house will be a brief presentation by DNR staff on the planning process. Following the introductory presentation, the public will have the opportunity to share their thoughts and ideas about recreation in a “listening station” format.

While the main focus of this effort is to develop recreation management plans for Raging River and Middle Fork Snoqualmie, the planning process also involves DNR-managed lands with existing management plans, such as Tiger Mountain State Forest, West Tiger Mountain NRCA, Mount Si NRCA, and Rattlesnake Mountain Scenic Area. The corridor also includes recreation lands managed by federal, state, and local entities. Although planning will not include activities on those lands, this strategic planning process will look at ways to improve coordination with managers of many of these lands.

For more information about the Snoqualmie Corridor Recreation Plan, visit: www.dnr.wa.gov/RecreationEducation/Topics/RecreationPlanning/Pages/amp_rec_snoqualmie_corridor_recre.aspx

 

More in News

Mayor John Marchione was among many community members to place their handprints in the wet cement below the new sign at the Muslim Association of Puget Sound in Redmond after the mosque’s old sign was vandalized in 2016. File photo
Examining hate crimes on the Eastside

The Anti-Defamation League has been tracking hate-fueled crimes and incidents to paint a picture of trends in communities.

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams speaking following his tour at Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic in Seattle on Feb. 7. Ashley Hiruko/staff photo.
Local House reps. vote in favor of removing MMR personal exemptions

Eastside politicians vote overwhelmingly in favor of HB 1638.

United Methodist vote has churches’ future in question

Congregations debate separation following gay-clergy, same-sex marriage ban.

Fall City voters will decide on fire district merger on April 23

Fire District 27 may merge with Eastside Fire and Rescue’s District 10 after the upcoming election.

SVSD bus yard following snowstorm. Photo courtesy of Snoqualmie Valley School District
Eastside schools announce schedule accommodations to snow days

MISD, SVSD, NSD and BSD have announced their plans to address the school days missed to Feb. snowstorms.

Sip Suds and Si returns to North Bend with wine, beer, art and live music. Photo courtesy of North Bend Downtown Foundation‎.
Sip Suds and Si returns to North Bend

The North Bend Downtown Foundation is partnering with wineries, breweries, artists and musicians for the second Sip Suds and Si.

Courtney Gregoire, Port of Seattle Commissioner, will speak at the Eastside Regional Business Summit on April 25. Photo courtesy of the Port of Seattle
Issaquah Chamber to host Eastside Regional Business Summit

The Greater Issaquah Chamber of Commerce will host the summit in Snoqualmie along with partners.

The Cedar Hills Regional Landfill is the only active landfill in King County. It will operate until at least 2028. It has been in operation since the 1960s. Aaron Kunkler/staff photo
Waste study puts numbers behind King County trash alternatives

County has one remaining landfill located near Maple Valley, and it’s nearing capacity

Most Read