New fishing rules allow Lake Sammamish anglers to keep some hatchery-reared coho

Anglers fishing at Lake Sammamish can now retain hatchery-reared coho salmon.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife announced last week that, effective now through May 31, people who catch coho salmon that are marked as hatchery-reared and 12 inches or longer, can keep the fish as part of their trout daily limits.

For waters in which these landlocked salmon rules apply, salmon are regulated as trout. An angler’s combined catch of marked hatchery coho salmon and trout applies toward the trout limit. All kokanee and all Chinook must be released. All steelhead and rainbow trout over 20 inches must also be released.

Marked hatchery-origin coho salmon are identified by a healed scar in the location of the adipose fin.

Fishers must have a current Washington fishing license. Check the WDFW “Fishing in Washington” rules pamphlet for details on fishing seasons and regulations.

For more information, contact the Mill Creek Regional Office, of the Department of Fish and Wildlife at (425) 775-1311.

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