Cookie Lovers, pay special attention

A look at whats happening in Fall City

  • Friday, October 3, 2008 5:15am
  • Opinion
Cookie Lovers, pay special attention

I received this as a forwarded e-mail, and although it was billed as

a “true story,” I can’t help but have

the feeling that it is actually one of those “urban legends.” In any case, the

outcome is delicious. Enjoy.

The tale is as follows: TRUE STORY! My daughter and I had

just finished a salad at an very expensive department store’s cafe in Dallas,

and decided to have a small dessert. Because both of us are such cookie

lovers, we decided to try the “N-M Cookie.” It was so excellent that

I asked if they would give me the recipe, and the waitress said with a

small frown, “I’m afraid not.”

“Well,” I said, “would you let

me buy the recipe?”

With a cute smile, she said, “Yes.” I asked how much, and she

responded, “Only two fifty.”

“It’s a great deal!” I said, with approval, “just add it to my tab.”

Thirty days later, I received my VISA statement from the store.

The total was just over $285! I looked again and remembered I had

spent $9.95 for two salads and about $20 for a scarf. As I glanced at the bottom

of the statement, it said, “Cookie recipe $250.” How outrageous!

I called the store’s accounting department to complain and told

them the waitress said the recipe was “two fifty.” Clearly that does not mean

“two hundred and fifty dollars” by any POSSIBLE interpretation of

the phrase. The store refused to budge. They would not reverse the

charge because, according to them, “What the waitress told you is not our

problem. You have already seen the recipe. We will not reverse charges at this point.”

I then mentioned the criminal statutes that govern fraud in Texas, and

I threatened to refer them to the Better Business Bureau and the state’s

Attorney General for engaging in fraud. The store wouldn’t budge.

I waited, thinking of how I could get even. I said, “Okay, you folks

are charging me $250, so now I’m going to make sure that every cookie

lover in the United States with an e-mail account has a $250 cookie recipe

from you … for free.

So, here it is! Pass it on! THE RECIPE (may be halved) 2 cups

butter, 4 cups flour, 2 tsp. baking soda, 2 cups sugar, 5 cups blended

oatmeal, 24 oz. chocolate chips, 2 cups brown sugar, 1 tsp. salt, 18 oz Hershey

bar (grated), 4 eggs, 2 tsp. baking powder, 2 tsp. vanilla, 3 cups chopped

nuts (your choice). Measure oatmeal and blend in a blender to a fine

powder. Cream the butter and both sugars. Add eggs and vanilla, mix together

with flour, oatmeal, salt, baking powder, and soda. Add chocolate

chips, Hershey bar and nuts. Roll into balls and place two inches apart on a

cookie sheet. Bake for 10 minutes at 375 degrees. Enjoy baking the most

expensive cookies in the world for FREE!!

PPP

My kids and I joined other happy hikers and climbed Rattlesnake

Ridge to enjoy the view and get above the haze. The ledge was crowded, but

the trail on up from there was pretty lonesome. Mt. Rainier truly sparkled!

Following that, we returned to Fall City and yes, went swimming in the

river. It was quite brisk, but incredibly refreshing! Enjoy these wonderful

days in this wonderful place we call home!

News Notes items may be

submitted to Janna Treisman

at Box 1329, Fall City, WA 98024; or phone (425) 222-5594 or

e-mail treismaj@hotmail.com.


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