Singing and playing “I heard it through the grapevine,” participants in the March of the Vegetables parade arrived in a festive group for the post-parade celebration in Duvall’s Depot Park. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Vegetables, farmers and friends marched in Duvall Saturday

Trees and peas walked, carrots were used as drumsticks, and bystanders marveled as the March of the Vegetables debuted on Duvall streets Saturday.

This parade celebrating home-made art, community, and the return of another growing season, drew more than 200 participants, some carrying vegetable art, some dressed as vegetables, some just wearing them. There were also farmers, pollinators, and even Santa Claus showed up.

“You have to hoe, hoe, hoe your vegetables,” he explained.

Following a short parade down Duvall side streets, the group marched down the sidewalks of Duvall’s Main Street, to the entrance to Depot Park, for a post-parade community celebration of live music and children’s activities.

Event organizer Betsy MacWhinney thanked the participants and volunteers for supporting the whimsical event.




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Vegetables and farmers alike marched into Duvall’s Depot Park Saturday, to conclude the March of the Vegetables parade and start the community festival that followed. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Parade organizer Betsy MacWhinney thanks all the parade participants for attending the first ever March of the Vegetables Saturday in Duvall. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Colorful balloons gave this parade marcher a Carmen-Miranda-style hat. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

A young boy rides on his father’s shoulders for the March of the Vegetables. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Vegetable costumes made use of balloons, blankets and other props. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Maren von Nostrand accompanies Joan and Michael Shure during a musical performance in Depot Park following the March of the Vegetables parade. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Erin Moore dons a veggie necklace for the March of the Vegetables celebration. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Students from Eagle Rock School performed “The Vegetable Song,” Saturday at Depot Park. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Dressed as farmers, flowers, vegetables and pollinators, Doug Klaiber, Beth Burris and Clare Chapple enjoyed the March of the Vegetables. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

Some of the costume veggies looked a little tired by the end of the day. Carol Ladwig/Staff Photo

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