Snoqualmie City Clerk Jodi Warren swears in re-elected councilmembers Katherine Ross and Sean Sundwall at the Jan. 27 city council meeting. Courtesy photo

Snoqualmie City Clerk Jodi Warren swears in re-elected councilmembers Katherine Ross and Sean Sundwall at the Jan. 27 city council meeting. Courtesy photo

Snoqualmie councilmembers sworn in for new terms

Appointment of new city administrator also approved.

At the Jan. 27 city council meeting, Snoqualmie swore in its returning councilmembers, confirmed its interim city administrator and named its parks and public works director.

The council also assigned council committee liaisons and appointed board and commission members.

Three council seats were in contention during the November 2019 General Election. In all three races the incumbents came out on top.

Re-elected councilmembers Katherine Ross (Position 2), and Sean Sundwall (Position 6), were sworn in by city clerk Jodi Warren.

“Congratulations to both of you, and thank you for being willing to continue your service,” Mayor Matt Larson said. “I look forward to working with you.”

Councilmember James Mayhew (Position 4), had been filling a vacant seat, so he was previously sworn in on Dec. 9 after the election results were certified.

Mayhew was elected by his fellow councilmembers as mayor pro tem for 2020. He will serve as mayor in the even of Mayor Larson’s absence. He is also the chair of the finance and administration committee.

The council then appointed and confirmed Brian Krause, who has worked with the city for more than two years as director of parks and public works. Krause had served as interim director of parks and public works and previously worked at the city of Bellevue for more than 10 years.

Mayor Lason commended Krause for his recent efforts.

“Brian once again showed his competence with handling the snowstorm pretty deftly this past week or so,” Larson said.

“Thank you for the opportunity, mayor, to serve as the director of parks and public works,” Krause said. “I’m looking forward to working with all of you, and continuing the work we started over the last couple years. We’ve got a lot to do, and I’m looking forward to taking on the challenges that we have ahead.”

The council also confirmed the Jan. 3 appointment of Rick Rudometkin, former Sammamish city manager, as interim city administrator. The motion to appoint him passed 6-1 with councilmember Peggy Shepard dissenting.

An amendment was successfully made to the motion appointing Rudometkin so the appointment is for no longer than six months. The mayor clarified that the amendment does not necessarily limit Rudometkin’s time in the position but it does mean the council would revisit the appointment after six months.

“Congratulations, Rick,” Larson said. “I’m excited to have you on board.”

The city council also met for its annual two-day retreat on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 at the Club at Snoqualmie Ridge. The retreat gives time for deeper discussion on topics such as strategic planning, capital improvement plan, council goals and budget strategies.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

Snoqualmie’s new Interim City Administrator Rick Rudometkin (L) and Mayor Matt Larson. Courtesy photo

Snoqualmie’s new Interim City Administrator Rick Rudometkin (L) and Mayor Matt Larson. Courtesy photo

Courtesy photo                                From left, Brian Krause, new director of parks and public works and Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson.

Courtesy photo From left, Brian Krause, new director of parks and public works and Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson.

More in News

Snow Lake, located near Snoqualmie Pass in Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. File photo
File photo
Snow Lake, located near Snoqualmie Pass in Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest.
Federal funding to support maintenance in Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest

The Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, a nonprofit organization that works to… Continue reading

Geographic dispersion of Washington State Patrol commissioned personnel who lost their jobs Oct. 18. (Washington State Patrol)
Rather than get vaccine, nearly 1,900 state workers lose jobs

Exactly how many people will be out of work for ignoring Gov.… Continue reading

Snoqualmie City Hall. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie
Snoqualmie opens another round of COVID-19 relief funding

The City of Snoqualmie is offering another round of COVID-19 relief grants… Continue reading

Spring Chinook Salmon.  Photo courtesy Michael Humling, US Fish & Wildlife Service
Duvall nonprofit sues Department of Fish and Wildlife over salmon hatchery policy

Wild Fish Conservancy, a Duvall-based nonprofit, and The Conservation Angler filed suit… Continue reading

Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson. File Photo Conor Wilson/Valley Record
Nearly all Snoqualmie city employees vaccinated

Nearly all Snoqualmie city staff are vaccinated against COVID-19, as the city’s… Continue reading

King County Courthouse adjacent to City Hall Park (courtesy of City of Seattle)
County council votes to take dangerous park out of Seattle’s hands

City Hall Park, next to the courthouse in downtown Seattle, has had multiple reports of crime.

stock image
Health care workers call on state’s hospitals to help mitigate staffing crisis

Health care workers unions claim hospitals have the resources to fix the issue.

file photo
Eastside Fire & Rescue says their response times will not be affected by absence of unvaccinated employees

Spokesperson says about 13 employees have left the department at the moment.

File photo
Do you need to pay for your COVID hospital stay?

Washington state law requires hospitals to provide free care for certain income brackets.

Most Read