Snoqualmie City Clerk Jodi Warren swears in re-elected councilmembers Katherine Ross and Sean Sundwall at the Jan. 27 city council meeting. Courtesy photo

Snoqualmie City Clerk Jodi Warren swears in re-elected councilmembers Katherine Ross and Sean Sundwall at the Jan. 27 city council meeting. Courtesy photo

Snoqualmie councilmembers sworn in for new terms

Appointment of new city administrator also approved.

At the Jan. 27 city council meeting, Snoqualmie swore in its returning councilmembers, confirmed its interim city administrator and named its parks and public works director.

The council also assigned council committee liaisons and appointed board and commission members.

Three council seats were in contention during the November 2019 General Election. In all three races the incumbents came out on top.

Re-elected councilmembers Katherine Ross (Position 2), and Sean Sundwall (Position 6), were sworn in by city clerk Jodi Warren.

“Congratulations to both of you, and thank you for being willing to continue your service,” Mayor Matt Larson said. “I look forward to working with you.”

Councilmember James Mayhew (Position 4), had been filling a vacant seat, so he was previously sworn in on Dec. 9 after the election results were certified.

Mayhew was elected by his fellow councilmembers as mayor pro tem for 2020. He will serve as mayor in the even of Mayor Larson’s absence. He is also the chair of the finance and administration committee.

The council then appointed and confirmed Brian Krause, who has worked with the city for more than two years as director of parks and public works. Krause had served as interim director of parks and public works and previously worked at the city of Bellevue for more than 10 years.

Mayor Lason commended Krause for his recent efforts.

“Brian once again showed his competence with handling the snowstorm pretty deftly this past week or so,” Larson said.

“Thank you for the opportunity, mayor, to serve as the director of parks and public works,” Krause said. “I’m looking forward to working with all of you, and continuing the work we started over the last couple years. We’ve got a lot to do, and I’m looking forward to taking on the challenges that we have ahead.”

The council also confirmed the Jan. 3 appointment of Rick Rudometkin, former Sammamish city manager, as interim city administrator. The motion to appoint him passed 6-1 with councilmember Peggy Shepard dissenting.

An amendment was successfully made to the motion appointing Rudometkin so the appointment is for no longer than six months. The mayor clarified that the amendment does not necessarily limit Rudometkin’s time in the position but it does mean the council would revisit the appointment after six months.

“Congratulations, Rick,” Larson said. “I’m excited to have you on board.”

The city council also met for its annual two-day retreat on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 at the Club at Snoqualmie Ridge. The retreat gives time for deeper discussion on topics such as strategic planning, capital improvement plan, council goals and budget strategies.


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Snoqualmie’s new Interim City Administrator Rick Rudometkin (L) and Mayor Matt Larson. Courtesy photo

Snoqualmie’s new Interim City Administrator Rick Rudometkin (L) and Mayor Matt Larson. Courtesy photo

Courtesy photo
                                From left, Brian Krause, new director of parks and public works and Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson.

Courtesy photo From left, Brian Krause, new director of parks and public works and Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson.

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