Snoqualmie City Council increases human services funding for 2018

In a unanimous vote, the Snoqualmie City Council increased the total amount of annual human services funding from 1 percent of the city’s general fund revenues, to 1.12 percent for the 2018 allocation process at their Sept. 11 meeting.

The resolution that came before the council amended the city’s comprehensive financial policies to increase the human services allocation to $169,000 for 2018, which is $33,000 increase over the 2017 budget amount.

Since 2008, the city has funded human services organizations with a dedicated 1 percent of general fund revenues every year. Various non-profit organizations apply for the funding each year and the city’s Human Services Committee makes recommendations on the organizations to receive funding.

Last December, a total of $136,000 was approved for 11 organizations including the Snoqualmie Valley Food Bank, Encompass, Mt. Si Senior Center, Two Rivers School, and Friends of Youth.

In looking for ways to improve the program, the city’s finance and administration committee and staff discussed keeping the method of determining budget by a percentage of the general fund and slightly increasing the total amount of funding the program receives.

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