From left, Aaron Carpenter – I-5 Designs, Harold Ellebracht, Snoqualmie Tribe Council Member Daniel Willoughby, Snoqualmie Tribe Vice Chairman Michael Ross, Snoqualmie Tribe Chairman Robert de los Angeles, Snoqualmie Casino CEO Brian Decorah, Ron Enick, Chris Cummings, Linda Smith and Kasama Chantanee. Photo courtesy of Maria Kosanke

From left, Aaron Carpenter – I-5 Designs, Harold Ellebracht, Snoqualmie Tribe Council Member Daniel Willoughby, Snoqualmie Tribe Vice Chairman Michael Ross, Snoqualmie Tribe Chairman Robert de los Angeles, Snoqualmie Casino CEO Brian Decorah, Ron Enick, Chris Cummings, Linda Smith and Kasama Chantanee. Photo courtesy of Maria Kosanke

Snoqualmie Casino gets private gaming room

The addition is the final casino upgrade of 2018.

Last week Snoqualmie Casino celebrated its 10-year anniversary and opened a new private gaming salon.

The opening featured a ribbon cutting ceremony with members of the Snoqualmie Tribe, Snoqualmie Casino team members and partnering design firm, I-5 Designs.

“Opening our Private Gaming Salon allows us to provide the premiere table game experience to guests who prefer more of a private gaming atmosphere,” Snoqualmie Casino president and CEO Brian Decorah said.

Snoqualmie Casino design partner “spared no expense conceptualizing the design for the venue,” a casino press release said. “To create a totally exclusive feel at the new Private Gaming Salon, our team built an interior room featuring an electrochromic glass wall. This provides the ability to change the transparent glass to opaque with the press of a button. The outer glass wall features an overlay that is a custom application of patterns from the history and culture of the Snoqualmie Tribe.”

The Private Gaming Salon is the final upgrade project for Snoqualmie Casino in 2018. Previous renovations and upgrades this year included the MIST Bar, fully enclosed non-smoking gaming room, the Snoqualmie Café & Deli and the comprehensive infusion of tribal art design throughout the casino.

For more information, go online to www.snocasino.com.


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Snoqualmie Casino staff members (from left) Trevor House, Linda Yem, Sophorn Seng, Ross Garmon and Jan Wu surround a gaming table in the new private gaming room at Snoqualmie Casino. Photo courtesy of Tarah Smigun

Snoqualmie Casino staff members (from left) Trevor House, Linda Yem, Sophorn Seng, Ross Garmon and Jan Wu surround a gaming table in the new private gaming room at Snoqualmie Casino. Photo courtesy of Tarah Smigun

From left, Aaron Carpenter – I-5 Designs, Harold Ellebracht, Snoqualmie Tribe Council Member Daniel Willoughby, Snoqualmie Tribe Vice Chairman Michael Ross, Snoqualmie Tribe Chairman Robert de los Angeles, Snoqualmie Casino CEO Brian Decorah, Ron Enick, Chris Cummings, Linda Smith and Kasama Chantanee. Photo courtesy of Maria Kosanke

From left, Aaron Carpenter – I-5 Designs, Harold Ellebracht, Snoqualmie Tribe Council Member Daniel Willoughby, Snoqualmie Tribe Vice Chairman Michael Ross, Snoqualmie Tribe Chairman Robert de los Angeles, Snoqualmie Casino CEO Brian Decorah, Ron Enick, Chris Cummings, Linda Smith and Kasama Chantanee. Photo courtesy of Maria Kosanke

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