Sharing the feast: North Bend Elementary fourth graders continue annual Thanksgiving tradition | Photo Gallery

To America! The group of fourth-grade buddies, Trevor Bradshaw, Raj Chaliparamail, Tanner Swanson, Kaelyn Giusti, Logan Shadel and Brady Maw clinked plastic glasses together at their construction-paper-covered dining table and toasted the nation—with apple juice. Each kid had a plate in front of them heaped with turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, olives, and popcorn. Swanson declared it “the best activity ever done in the school.”

From left

To America! The group of fourth-grade buddies, Trevor Bradshaw, Raj Chaliparamail, Tanner Swanson, Kaelyn Giusti, Logan Shadel and Brady Maw clinked plastic glasses together at their construction-paper-covered dining table and toasted the nation—with apple juice. Each kid had a plate in front of them heaped with turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, olives, and popcorn. Swanson declared it “the best activity ever done in the school.”

Fourth graders mingled and dined in classic style in the 10th annual fourth grade Thanksgiving feast, organized and served at North Bend Elementary Wednesday, Nov. 26, by a group of 18 parents.

Children varied on preferences for turkey, stuffing or potatoes, but surprisingly, the cranberry sauce had few takers. Maybe it was the tartness. Young diners were well-behaved, though, choosing their entrees, not rushing, except when third grade teacher Anne Melgaard appeared at the feast—she was mobbed by former pupils in a group hug.

Fourth grade teacher Tom Fladland asked one group of boys, Owen Watters, Henry Chapman and Brady Maw, to bring a to-go plate and silverware to their first grade teacher, Kelsey Carr. Watters and Chapman balanced the plate down the hall and across the courtyard.

“They’re so thoughtful,” said Carr, who was touched by the boys’ special trip. “That’s very sweet.

Brady Maw rushes to catch up with Owen Watters, left, and Henry Chapman, tasked with bringing a plate of turkey, stuffing and potatoes to teacher Kelsey Carr. Fourth graders at North Bend Elementary enjoyed the 10th annual Thanksgiving Feast Wednesday, Nov. 26. Eighteen parents put on the event, which mingles students from four different classes in a classic classroom dining experience.

Maddy Lemieux and Fiona Harrison awaits turkey served by parent Russel Maw.

 

Jacob Dean stocks up at the chow line. His favorite: “Probably the turkey.”

Fourth grade teachers at North Bend Elementary: Mrs. McCloskey, Mr. Fladland, Mrs. Anderson and Mrs. Fassler

Fourth graders hug their third grade teacher, Anne Melgaard, who visited their classroom dining experience.

Sophia Fliegel holds her Thanksgiving feast plate.




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