Salmon habitat receives award

A salmon habitat in the Snoqualmie Watershed was awarded $320,000 recently by the state Salmon Recovery Funding Board.

  • Thursday, October 2, 2008 7:58pm
  • News

A salmon habitat in the Snoqualmie Watershed was awarded $320,000 recently by the state Salmon Recovery Funding Board.

The Raging River Preston Reach Restoration/Acquisition project was one of eight projects in King County to receive an award. The total amount awarded was $3.4 million.

The Raging River is a spawning area for Chinook salmon, which are listed as “threatened” under the federal Endangered Species Act. The project will restore seven acres of floodplain habitat in the Raging River by setting back 1,200 feet of levee and allowing the river to naturally meander. Up to 10 acres of floodplain habitat next to the project site may be purchased to preserve the value of the restored land.

According to Kirk Anderson, Snoqualmie Basin steward, this particular section of the river has a fairly wide floodplain, which provides the opportunity for the river to have a main channel and a side channel.

“This habitat diversity is really good for spawning Chinook,” he said.

An additional $735,000 for the project is coming from the King Conservation District, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Conservation Futures Fund and King County.

Anderson said he hopes the project will be started this summer. A previous grant from the board helped pay for the design.

This and the other local projects that received awards vied with proposals from across the state in a rigorous evaluation process intended to identify the most effective and scientifically sound projects statewide. Across the state, the board allocated $26.6 million for 104 habitat acquisition, restoration and assessment projects. Funding from the board comes from the federal and state governments.

Before being sent to the state board for review, the project sponsors first had to present the proposals to local science panels and steering committees in each watershed. The steering committees are citizen-stakeholder groups that include representatives from local governments, environmental and business groups and federal and state agencies. The steering committees evaluated the proposals in terms of their benefit to salmon, certainty of success and level of community support. The board considers the local evaluation along with its own technical analysis when making its funding decisions.

While the primary focus of the projects is to protect and restore habitat used by salmon, the improvements to the aquatic ecosystems are expected to create benefits for people, too. Improved flood protection, waste assimilation and better recreational opportunities are a few of the ecosystem goods and services that will be improved through these projects.

For information on salmon habitat conservation in the watersheds, visit www.govlink.org/watersheds.

More in News

Snoqualmie Valley Food Bank team members, from left, volunteers Don and Carolyn DeVolder, Mount Si High School sophomore Shira Shecter, volunteer Becky Sydnor, Operations Manager Heather Walsh, Teri Wood, Mickey Martindale, and Debbie Rowley with Mount Si freshman daughter Ellie. Natalie DeFord/staff photo
Snoqualmie Valley Food Bank needs volutneers

Donations also needed, specifically Thanksgiving side dishes.

Desi Cuddihy’s fourth-grade students welcome veterans, including Navy veterans Mark and Angie Kennedy (center) as they enter the Snoqualmie Elementary Veterans Day assembly on Nov. 8. Madison Miller / staff photo
Snoqualmie Elementary fourth graders honor veterans with annual assembly

Desi Cuddihy’s fourth graders host a Veterans Day breakfast and assembly for the 11th year.

Political activist Tim Eyman campaigns for Initiative 976 on Nov. 5 in downtown Bellevue. The initiative promised $30 car tabs while functionally eliminating the ability of agencies like Sound Transit to raise taxes for its projects. Photo by Aaron Kunkler
Election analysis: Eastside cities largely voted against I-976

Most Eastside cities weren’t swayed by I-976, though more voters approved it than the county average.

A King County judge found the company misled customers into thinking it was a charity. Photo courtesy of the state Attorney General’s office
Judge rules Value Village deceived customers

The King County judge found the company misled customers into thinking it was a charity.

The Snoqualmie Valley Veterans Memorial recognizes all veterans from the Valley. Natalie DeFord/staff photo
Veterans Day recognized in the valley

Events celebrate local service members, past and present.

Mary-Lee Johnson’s North Bend Elementary kindergarten class of 1998 made a message in a bottle. It was found 21 years later. Photo courtesy of Mary-Lee Johnson
Message in a bottle found 21 years later

The bottle traveled over 3,000 miles; found off the coast of Bird Island 21 years later.

King County will challenge legality of I-976

County Executive Dow Constantine: ‘We must clean up another mess that Tim Eyman has created for our state, our region, and our economy’

Dariel Norris and Gene Pollard run for Public Hospital District 4 Commissioner Position 2. Courtesy photos
Norris leads in Hospital District 4 race

Preliminary General Election results.

Most Read