8th Congressional District Representative Dave Reichert

Rep. Reichert announces he won’t run for re-election in 2018

U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Auburn, will not run for an eighth term in 2018.

The 67-year-old Congressman said in a news release Wednesday that he made the decision based on what he felt was best for his family.

“After spending time during the August work period with family and friends, reflecting on the past, discussing the future, and celebrating another birthday, I have decided this will be my last term and I will not run for reelection in November 2018,” Reichert said in a statement. “It was not an easy decision but I believe it was the right one for my family and me. I have spent my entire career and devoted my life to service. I see this not just as a job, but as a calling—a calling I will not walk away from.”

Reichert’s decision creates a political opportunity for Democrats who have been looking to flip his 8th Congressional District seat and regain control of the U.S. House. Democrats have recently been lining up to unseat Reichert, who represents a “swing district” that includes parts of eastern King and Pierce counties, spans the Cascade range and stretches to Kittitas and Chelan counties.

State Rep. Drew Stokesbary, R-Auburn, is among the candidates rumored to be considering the seat for the mid-term election. Stokesbary, a Duke University educated and Notre Dame Law School graduate, works outside of the Legislature as a lawyer.

Reichert has been the target of much criticism from Democrats and Republicans alike. That pressure has only increased, most recently coming from his constituents and opponents who have attacked him for not holding public town hall meetings. In response, Reichert said such gatherings have “degenerated into shouting, yelling, and screaming matches.”

Opponents also urged Reichert to vote down the House GOP health care plan that passed in May. Reichert was one of 20 Republicans who broke party lines and voted against the bill.

For Reichert, the decision to retire comes after a long career of public service.

In addition to his seven terms in Congress, he was a member of the U.S. Air Force Reserves for six years and worked with the King County Sheriff’s Office for 33 years, becoming the sheriff himself in 1997. Reichert gained national prominence in that role when he helped bring Gary Ridgway, the Green River Killer, to justice. The resulting publicity served as a springboard to higher office for Reichert.

Reichert, in his release, touched on a number of achievement.

“In my congressional career, I have always strived to improve the daily lives of my constituents and preserve the majestic beauty of our region,” he said. “Whether it was through my work to expand the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area, improve our foster care system and combat sex trafficking, or secure equipment and resources for our first responders, I have taken this honor and responsibility seriously.”

Reichert continued:

“Early on, the importance of trade to the region was clear. From serving on President Obama’s Export Council to battling to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank to leading the fight to pass the U.S.-Korea free trade agreement, I have always fought to give our exporters the chance to sell their goods and services around the world,” he said. “Now, at this critical time, serving as the first Chairman of the Ways and Means Subcommittee on Trade from Washington State, I remain steadfast in my commitment to Washington’s workers, manufacturers and growers—the best in the world.

Reichert acknowledged that he has more work to do before he leaves office.

“As I finish my last term in the U.S. House of Representatives, I will continue to fight for hard working families, small business and all that makes our community great,” he said.

Calling Reichert a friend, King County Council member Reagan Dunn praised the Congressman for his work.

“He has done a terrific job and I am very proud of what he has accomplished for all of us,” Dunn said in a statement.

“Serving in Congress is very challenging and I watched my late mother, Jennifer Dunn, fight many battles there, as Dave has,” Dunn added. “But the environment in Congress has become increasingly challenging for our elected leaders. I commend my friend for working on our behalf during this unusually toxic time in Washington, D.C.”


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Valley Shuttle. Photo courtesy of Snoqualmie Valley Transportation’s Facebook page.
Five-year transit plan in the works for the valley

Snoqualmie Valley Transportation outlines multiple goals for area’s towns and cities.

A site plan for the Snoqualmie Valley Athletic Center. Provided by the city of North Bend
Snoqualmie Valley Athletic Center could be completed by February

Construction on the project is expected to begin on Sept. 14.

Seven decades later, the search for two missing Navy pilots continues

The pilots are thought to have disappeared near Black Lake, northeast of North Bend.

The truck of the Renton family as it was found Tuesday. While fleeing the Cold Springs Fire two adults were severely burned and one toddler died. Courtesy photo/Okanogan Sheriff’s Office
Toddler killed as Renton family flees Cold Springs Fire

The parents were severely burned and are being treated at Harborview Medical Center

A view of the Palmer Fire, located seven miles southwest of Oroville in north central Washington. Source: InciWeb
Antifa isn’t starting Washington wildfires

Online conspiracy theories are spreading as the West Coast burns.

A plane drops fire retardant on the Palmer Mountain Fire last week. The fire is listed as 84 percent contained, and fully lined. Laura Knowlton/Sound Publishing staff photo
Threat multiplier: How climate change, coronavirus and weather are scorching WA

Dry summer conspired with the pandemic and a wind storm.

Screenshot from the state Employment Security Department’s website at esd.wa.gov.
Workers may qualify for an extra $1,500 in unemployment back pay

A federal program will give some of the state’s unemployed a $300 weekly bump for the past five weeks.

Screenshot of the air quality monitor at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 8. Courtesy Puget Sound Clean Air Agency.
King County faces unhealthy air quality due to wildfire smoke

Weather monitors recommend people limit time outdoors, especially children, seniors and those with heart or lung disease.

Image courtesy of the Washington Department of Natural Resources.
Massive wildfires incinerate WA

All state Department of Natural Resources lands were closed to recreational activities on Sept. 8.

Snoqualmie’s Train Shed reopens Sept. 11

The Northwest Railway Museum is reopening the Train Shed exhibit hall on… Continue reading

Ingrid Anderson is running against incumbent Mark Mullet for the 5th Legislative District’s Senate seat. Photo from Anderson’s campaign Facebook
Inslee endorses Anderson over Mullet for 5th District Senate seat

Mullet, the incumbent, came in second during primary, but has raised more money so far.