Landslide creates crack in Fall City road, allowing for a one lane entry and exit. Courtesy of King County Road Services

Landslide creates crack in Fall City road, allowing for a one lane entry and exit. Courtesy of King County Road Services

Red Cross opens shelter after minor landslide in Fall City

Shelter opened at 6:30 a.m. on Feb. 11.

Following landslide activity on 356th Drive Southeast on Feb. 10, the Red Cross opening an emergency shelter at the Snoqualmie Valley Alliance Church.

Red Cross responders are providing shelter, food and clothing, while also encouraging those who are evacuating to bring necessities such as medication, bedding, and important documents.

Voluntary evacuations took place in the evening on Feb. 10, but “that was really out of an abundance of caution,” said King County’s communications manager Broch Bender.

On Feb. 11, the road remained open.

Bender said the landslide caused the ground beneath the road to shift slowly. The primary concern is if it begins to rain, the shift could accelerate.

“We’ve got folks out there monitoring throughout the day and night to look for ground movement,” he said. “We’ve got special tools that measure cracks in the road to see if they’ve grown, and we’re closely watching it.”

Some 75 houses are located on 356th Drive Southeast, and if greater ground shifts occur, residents may have no way out.

The King County Emergency Management office issued a press release on Feb. 10 saying homeowners and businesses impacted by the storm may be eligable for financial assistance due to damages. To submit a damage report, or for more information, go online to www.kingcounty.gov/damage.


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