Cast trailers for “Three Busy Debras” filming at the Snoqualmie YMCA parking lot on Sept. 4. Madison Miller / staff photo

Cast trailers for “Three Busy Debras” filming at the Snoqualmie YMCA parking lot on Sept. 4. Madison Miller / staff photo

New TV show filming in Snoqualmie

“Three Busy Debras” is being filmed in cities in the Seattle area, including Snoqualmie.

A new television show will feature familiar settings for Snoqualmie residents.

“The Busy Debras” is a quarter-hour live-action episodic series set to air on Adult Swim. The show follows the surreal day-to-day lives of three deranged housewives, all named Debra, in their affluent suburban town of Lemoncurd, Connecticut.

Sept. 4 marked the second day of filming in Snoqualmie. Filming is currently taking place at Snoqualmie Valley YMCA. The cast and crew plan to stay in Snoqualmie throughout the week.

The show originally began as a web series created by a trio of comedians, Mitra Jouhari, Sandy Honig and Alyssa Stonoha. The show, with a pilot ordered by Adult Swim over a year ago, began production this summer.

Saturday Night Live and Parks and Rec star, Amy Poehler and Kim Lessing are executive producers through Paper Kite Productions.

After the success of producing Todd Rohal’s “Hunky Boys Go Ding-Dong: Don’t Die Alone” for Adult Swim, Lacey Leavitt and Jonathan Caso are producing “Three Busy Debras.”

According to co-producer Leavitt, the show is being filmed in various cities in the greater Seattle area. Filming has already taken place in Everett, Edmonds and parts of Seattle. Snoqualmie is the show’s current filming location.

Leavitt said Snoqualmie was selected as a filming location because of its scenic setting.

“We needed to find a beautiful location,” she said. “We needed something picturesque and manicured…It needed to represent the class and affluence that these characters are trying to portray while their real lives are anything but.”

She said the contrast is part of what makes the show comedic.

“Three Busy Debras” is one of three projects approved for funding from Washington Filmworks (WF).

WF is a nonprofit 501(c)(6) organization that manages the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program as well as a diversity of resources for the creative industries in the state. Its mission is to create economic development opportunities by building and enhancing the competitiveness, profile and sustainability of Washington’s film industry.

Since launching the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program in 2007, WF has distributed $34.8 million in funding assistance to 120 projects, including 41 feature films, 11 television projects, 57 commercials and 11 Innovation Lab Projects. These projects have spent an estimated $123 million directly in the economy and created over 21,000 jobs for Washington resident cast and crew.

In March, Washington Filmworks announced Local Lens, making Washington State the first production incentive in the country to reserve its funding exclusively for projects creatively driven by Washington State residents.

According to Leavitt, the production is going incredibly well.

“Everyone is really enjoying being here and being in this beautiful city,” she said.

For more information about “Three Busy Debras” visit Washington Filmworks website.

More in News

Development has encroached on the East Lake Sammamish Trail (at right). Joe Livarchik/file photo
King County files lawsuit to finish East Lake Sammamish Trail

Homeowners have until September to remove buildings and other property from the right of way.

Bellevue residents Marko and Karla Ilicic play a hockey game in the Topgolf Swing Suite inside Forum Social House. Natalie DeFord/staff photo
Forum Social House opens in Bellevue

Eastside gets new nightclub, mini golf, swing suites.

In November 2019, Washington voters approved Initiative 976, which calls for $30 car tabs. Sound Publishing file photo
Republicans try to guarantee $30 car tabs amid court hangup

Lawmakers sponsor companion bills in the House and Senate.

North Bend swore in its new mayor and new council members at its Jan. 7, 2020 meeting. From left: King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert, North Bend council members Mary Miller, Chris Garcia, Ross Loudenback, Mayor Pro Tem Brenden Elwood, North Bend Mayor Rob McFarland, council members Alan Gothelf and Heather Koellen.
North Bend swears in new mayor, council

McFarland, Koellen, Miller join the table.

King County Metro’s battery-electric bus. Photo courtesy of kingcounty.gov
King County could bump up Metro electrification deadlines

Transportation generates nearly half of all greenhouse gas emissions in the state.

Gov. Jay Inslee delivered his 2020 State of the State Address on Tuesday, Jan. 14. (Photo courtesy of Washington State Office of the Governor)
Gov. Inslee delivers State of the State Address

By Leona Vaughn, WNPA News Service OLYMPIA — Gov. Jay Inslee stood… Continue reading

A 50-minute film called “Spawning Grounds,” which documents the effort to save a freshwater variety of kokanee salmon from Lake Sammamish, is finally ready for its debut in North Bend on Jan. 18. (Screenshot from film)
Spawning Grounds: Lake Sammamish kokanee documentary premieres Jan. 18

The film tracks the ‘all hands on deck’ effort to save the little red fish from extinction.

The Snoqualmie Depot at 38625 SE King St. is an inviting winterscape following a blanket of snow that fell on the region Jan. 12-13. William Shaw/staff photo
Snow day for schools; busy day for snowplows

Snoqualmie Valley gets blanket of snow.

Most Read