Cast trailers for “Three Busy Debras” filming at the Snoqualmie YMCA parking lot on Sept. 4. Madison Miller / staff photo

Cast trailers for “Three Busy Debras” filming at the Snoqualmie YMCA parking lot on Sept. 4. Madison Miller / staff photo

New TV show filming in Snoqualmie

“Three Busy Debras” is being filmed in cities in the Seattle area, including Snoqualmie.

A new television show will feature familiar settings for Snoqualmie residents.

“The Busy Debras” is a quarter-hour live-action episodic series set to air on Adult Swim. The show follows the surreal day-to-day lives of three deranged housewives, all named Debra, in their affluent suburban town of Lemoncurd, Connecticut.

Sept. 4 marked the second day of filming in Snoqualmie. Filming is currently taking place at Snoqualmie Valley YMCA. The cast and crew plan to stay in Snoqualmie throughout the week.

The show originally began as a web series created by a trio of comedians, Mitra Jouhari, Sandy Honig and Alyssa Stonoha. The show, with a pilot ordered by Adult Swim over a year ago, began production this summer.

Saturday Night Live and Parks and Rec star, Amy Poehler and Kim Lessing are executive producers through Paper Kite Productions.

After the success of producing Todd Rohal’s “Hunky Boys Go Ding-Dong: Don’t Die Alone” for Adult Swim, Lacey Leavitt and Jonathan Caso are producing “Three Busy Debras.”

According to co-producer Leavitt, the show is being filmed in various cities in the greater Seattle area. Filming has already taken place in Everett, Edmonds and parts of Seattle. Snoqualmie is the show’s current filming location.

Leavitt said Snoqualmie was selected as a filming location because of its scenic setting.

“We needed to find a beautiful location,” she said. “We needed something picturesque and manicured…It needed to represent the class and affluence that these characters are trying to portray while their real lives are anything but.”

She said the contrast is part of what makes the show comedic.

“Three Busy Debras” is one of three projects approved for funding from Washington Filmworks (WF).

WF is a nonprofit 501(c)(6) organization that manages the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program as well as a diversity of resources for the creative industries in the state. Its mission is to create economic development opportunities by building and enhancing the competitiveness, profile and sustainability of Washington’s film industry.

Since launching the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program in 2007, WF has distributed $34.8 million in funding assistance to 120 projects, including 41 feature films, 11 television projects, 57 commercials and 11 Innovation Lab Projects. These projects have spent an estimated $123 million directly in the economy and created over 21,000 jobs for Washington resident cast and crew.

In March, Washington Filmworks announced Local Lens, making Washington State the first production incentive in the country to reserve its funding exclusively for projects creatively driven by Washington State residents.

According to Leavitt, the production is going incredibly well.

“Everyone is really enjoying being here and being in this beautiful city,” she said.

For more information about “Three Busy Debras” visit Washington Filmworks website.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

Drive-thru COVID-19 virus testing last week in the parking lot near Everett Memorial Stadium in Everett. A study by the University of Washington and UnitedHealth Group, conducted at Everett Clinic locations, found that a less-intrusive form of the coronavirus test would require fewer precautions by health care workers. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
New self-swab COVID-19 test is just as accurate, study finds

The study, under peer review, was led by an Everett Clinic doctor. It could speed up testing nationwide.

Life Care Center (LCC) of Kirkland is facing more than $600,000 in fines for its response to the COVID-19 outbreak in its facility. Samantha Pak/Sound Publishing
Life Care in Kirkland facing more than $600K in fines for COVID-19 response

The facility has until Sept. 16 to pay or address areas of concern or it will be terminated.

Dentist checking patient’s teeth. Sound Publishing file photo
Dental foundation serves Medicaid patients through COVID-19

The Arcora Foundation is also attempting to expand its urgent care database, allowing those with different insurances to use its services during the outbreak.

Gov. Jay Inslee during a press conference April 2, 2020. (Photo courtesy of Gov. Inslee’s Facebook page)
Gov. Inslee extends stay-home order to May 4

As in other states, demand for intensive health care due to COVID-19 is expected to peak later in April.

Unemployment claims continue to climb

For the week of March 22-28, claims have reached more than 181,000.

Inslee to state businesses: Pivot to make medical equipment

The governor said Wednesday that the state must become self-reliant in the fight against COVID-19.

Eastsiders utilize technology to keep things running during COVID-19 outbreak

Technology and online habits have allowed businesses, city governments, nonprofits and residents to keep going while maintaining social distancing.

Amazon.com still has listings for medical equipment, but the website includes a caveat and other protections to ensure equipment is supplied to those who need it. Screenshot
Five businesses warned for price gouging

Ferguson sent cease and desist letters to five businesses, including one in Issaquah.

Most Read