New informational displays adorn the kiosk near the Snoqualmie Depot, depicting a walking tour of the Historic Downtown and its events. The design was created by local artist Kat Marshello. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie’s website.

New informational displays adorn the kiosk near the Snoqualmie Depot, depicting a walking tour of the Historic Downtown and its events. The design was created by local artist Kat Marshello. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie’s website.

New kiosk displays guide Historic Downtown Snoqualmie walk

Artowork, map helps visitors learn tales of the town.

New artwork welcomes wanderers of Snoqualmie. The kiosk along the walking path in the city’s Historic Downtown just got a makeover.

Two colorful and informational displays by local artist Kat Marshello now guides visitors on a walking tour of the town and its history. One display shares the historical and cultural overview of the downtown and the Snoqualmie River, with its industry and environment, and the other display shares the Historic Walking Tour of Downtown Snoqualmie, encouraging visitors to explore landmarks and local businesses.

Marshello said she was thrilled to work on the project, using some of her favorite art techniques to create the illustrated map and heritage displays.

“I hope the new designs will help inspire the community to explore more of Snoqualmie and connect them with the history of the area,” Marshello said. “I really enjoyed working on this project, as I got to utilize some of my favorite creative elements: vintage-inspired typography, rich colors, and hand-drawn illustrations. It was fun to incorporate iconic photography into these designs as well.”

She said her work for the kiosks was inspired by previous design and branding work she created for Savor Snoqualmie Valley — a partnership of Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, the city and business leaders that supports local farms, the arts, heritage, outdoor recreation and businesses. That project included travel brochures, maps, event flyers, banners and web elements, all featuring a custom logo, hand-lettering, brand colors and typography.

“Snoqualmie is a special place, and I’m happy to create work that will inspire others to connect with the natural beauty, heritage and local flavor of it,” she said.

Gail Folkins, city of Snoqualmie spokesperson, said a future display that lists Snoqualmie businesses, both downtown and on the Ridge, is planned for the other side of the kiosk. While the displays in the kiosk are new, the kiosk itself is pre-existing. It is located on the downtown boardwalk along Railroad Avenue (state Route 202) close to the Snoqualmie Depot.

Information and historic images were sourced from the Snoqualmie Tribe, King County Landmarks and Heritage Commission, Savor Snoqualmie Valley, the city, and the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum. The money for the displays comes from a Port of Seattle grant.

Marshello’s online portfolio of artwork and information can be found online at kmarshello.com.




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New informational displays adorn the kiosk near the Snoqualmie Depot, depicting a walking tour of the Historic Downtown and its events. The design was created by local artist Kat Marshello. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie’s website.

New informational displays adorn the kiosk near the Snoqualmie Depot, depicting a walking tour of the Historic Downtown and its events. The design was created by local artist Kat Marshello. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie’s website.

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