New informational displays adorn the kiosk near the Snoqualmie Depot, depicting a walking tour of the Historic Downtown and its events. The design was created by local artist Kat Marshello. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie’s website.

New informational displays adorn the kiosk near the Snoqualmie Depot, depicting a walking tour of the Historic Downtown and its events. The design was created by local artist Kat Marshello. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie’s website.

New kiosk displays guide Historic Downtown Snoqualmie walk

Artowork, map helps visitors learn tales of the town.

New artwork welcomes wanderers of Snoqualmie. The kiosk along the walking path in the city’s Historic Downtown just got a makeover.

Two colorful and informational displays by local artist Kat Marshello now guides visitors on a walking tour of the town and its history. One display shares the historical and cultural overview of the downtown and the Snoqualmie River, with its industry and environment, and the other display shares the Historic Walking Tour of Downtown Snoqualmie, encouraging visitors to explore landmarks and local businesses.

Marshello said she was thrilled to work on the project, using some of her favorite art techniques to create the illustrated map and heritage displays.

“I hope the new designs will help inspire the community to explore more of Snoqualmie and connect them with the history of the area,” Marshello said. “I really enjoyed working on this project, as I got to utilize some of my favorite creative elements: vintage-inspired typography, rich colors, and hand-drawn illustrations. It was fun to incorporate iconic photography into these designs as well.”

She said her work for the kiosks was inspired by previous design and branding work she created for Savor Snoqualmie Valley — a partnership of Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, the city and business leaders that supports local farms, the arts, heritage, outdoor recreation and businesses. That project included travel brochures, maps, event flyers, banners and web elements, all featuring a custom logo, hand-lettering, brand colors and typography.

“Snoqualmie is a special place, and I’m happy to create work that will inspire others to connect with the natural beauty, heritage and local flavor of it,” she said.

Gail Folkins, city of Snoqualmie spokesperson, said a future display that lists Snoqualmie businesses, both downtown and on the Ridge, is planned for the other side of the kiosk. While the displays in the kiosk are new, the kiosk itself is pre-existing. It is located on the downtown boardwalk along Railroad Avenue (state Route 202) close to the Snoqualmie Depot.

Information and historic images were sourced from the Snoqualmie Tribe, King County Landmarks and Heritage Commission, Savor Snoqualmie Valley, the city, and the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum. The money for the displays comes from a Port of Seattle grant.

Marshello’s online portfolio of artwork and information can be found online at kmarshello.com.

New informational displays adorn the kiosk near the Snoqualmie Depot, depicting a walking tour of the Historic Downtown and its events. The design was created by local artist Kat Marshello. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie’s website.

New informational displays adorn the kiosk near the Snoqualmie Depot, depicting a walking tour of the Historic Downtown and its events. The design was created by local artist Kat Marshello. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie’s website.

More in News

Matt Marshall, leader of the Washington Three Percenters gun rights group, addresses a crowd rallying for Second Amendment rights Jan. 17 at the state Capitol in Olympia. Marshall condemned Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, which expelled Rep. Matt Shea from the Republican Caucus. Marshall announced his candidacy for the 2nd District seat held by House Minority Leader J.T. Wilcox. Photo by Cameron Sheppard, WNPA News Service
Gun rights advocates rally at Capitol

Criticism levied at Matt Shea investigation, Republican leadership.

Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson (center) announced a lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson in a press conference Jan. 2. Debbie Warfield of Everett (left) lost her son to a heroin overdose in 2012. Skagit County Commissioner Lisa Janicki (right) lost her son to an overdose of OxyContin in 2017. They are joined by Rep. Lauren Davis of Shoreline (second from right), founder of the Washington Recovery Alliance. (TVW screenshot)
AG Bob Ferguson talks lawsuits, gun control

Washington state Attorney General stopped by Sound Publishing’s Kirkland office.

Development has encroached on the East Lake Sammamish Trail (at right). Joe Livarchik/file photo
King County files lawsuit to finish East Lake Sammamish Trail

Homeowners have until September to remove buildings and other property from the right of way.

Bellevue residents Marko and Karla Ilicic play a hockey game in the Topgolf Swing Suite inside Forum Social House. Natalie DeFord/staff photo
Forum Social House opens in Bellevue

Eastside gets new nightclub, mini golf, swing suites.

In November 2019, Washington voters approved Initiative 976, which calls for $30 car tabs. Sound Publishing file photo
Republicans try to guarantee $30 car tabs amid court hangup

Lawmakers sponsor companion bills in the House and Senate.

Courtesy photos
                                New Carnation city councilmembers Tim Harris and Adair Hawkins.
Carnation council swears in for new biennium

New members, leadership appointments.

North Bend swore in its new mayor and new council members at its Jan. 7, 2020 meeting. From left: King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert, North Bend council members Mary Miller, Chris Garcia, Ross Loudenback, Mayor Pro Tem Brenden Elwood, North Bend Mayor Rob McFarland, council members Alan Gothelf and Heather Koellen.
North Bend swears in new mayor, council

McFarland, Koellen, Miller join the table.

King County Metro’s battery-electric bus. Photo courtesy of kingcounty.gov
King County could bump up Metro electrification deadlines

Transportation generates nearly half of all greenhouse gas emissions in the state.

Most Read