New and returning Snoqualmie council members sworn in

  • Wednesday, January 17, 2018 3:47pm
  • News

The newest additions to the Snoqualmie city council were sworn in at the first meeting of the year on Monday, Jan. 8, at city hall.

Matt Laase and Peggy Shepard were both sworn in to their first terms as members of the council. Incumbents who won their races, Bob Jeans, Bryan Holloway and Mayor Matt Larson, were sworn in again as well. Other new councilmembers, Sean Sundwall, Katherine Ross, and Jim Mayhew were sworn in when they were first appointed as they filled empty positions in 2017.

In addition to the swearing in of new and returning councilmembers, Bryan Holloway was appointed to be Mayor Pro-Tem for his next term.

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