Photo courtesy of U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency

Photo courtesy of U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency

Legislature ‘prays’ for Congress to curb president’s ability to launch nukes

Washington has more nuclear weapons than any other state

By Sean Harding, WNPA Olympia New Bureau

OLYMPIA – Democratic lawmakers in Washington state have asked the U.S. Congress to ensure the president does not have the sole authority to launch a nuclear strike — except in cases of retaliation to a nuclear attack.

The state House and Senate each presented memorials to the federal government and president requesting to make it U.S. policy not to use nuclear weapons first.

“Your Memorialists respectfully pray that Congress take appropriate steps to move back from the brink of nuclear war by establishing a system of checks and balances to ensure that the President shall no longer have the sole, unchecked authority to launch nuclear weapons, except in circumstances of retaliation to a nuclear attack,” the memorial reads.

Senate Joint Memorial 8006 was heard in the Senate Committee on State Government, Tribal Relations and Elections on Feb. 22.

The document cites Washington state’s role as being home to the largest collection of nuclear weapons in the Western Hemisphere; the trillions of dollars required to update and maintain the U.S. arsenal; the global “catastrophic human, environmental, and economic consequences” of a nuclear strike; and the “inalienable right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, and to live a life free from the threat of nuclear weapons” for all Americans, as reasons for Congress to take action.

“Ever since the beginning of the Cold War, our greatest fear: that nuclear weapons of some nation would fall into the hands of a leader who was deranged, psychopathic or mentally ill,” said Bruce Amundson with Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility. “We’re much too close to that right now.”

“It’s particularly important for the state of Washington to take point on this,” said Sen. Bob Hasegawa, D-Beacon Hill, who prime-sponsored the Senate version of the memorial. “Because we have more nuclear weapons in our state than any other state … that makes us a prime target.”

Sens. Karen Keiser, D-Kent, David Frockt, D-Seattle, Sam Hunt, D-Olympia, Patty Kuderer, D-Bellevue, Jamie Pedersen, D-Seattle, and Rebecca Saldaña, D-Seattle, co-sponsored the Senate document.

The House companion document, Joint Memorial 4008, was introduced by Reps. Gael Tarleton, D-Seattle, Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim and Gerry Pollet, D-Seattle.

“With the Trident base at Bangor, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, the naval base in Bremerton, Boeing — we are targeted in the eventuality of a full-scale nuclear attack,” Amundson said. “This Puget Sound area would be incinerated.”

If approved by the full Legislature, copies of the memorial would be distributed to President Donald Trump along with the president of the Senate, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and each member of Congress from Washington state.

“I think we need to not just lead by example for the benefit of the world, but for self-preservation sake,” Hasegawa said.


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