Kelly Finnigan, originally from Monophonics, recently released his first solo album. He and The Atonements will perform at Carnation’s Timber! Outdoor Music Festival on July 12. Photo by Whitney Pelfrey

Kelly Finnigan, originally from Monophonics, recently released his first solo album. He and The Atonements will perform at Carnation’s Timber! Outdoor Music Festival on July 12. Photo by Whitney Pelfrey

Kelly Finnigan to perform at Carnation music festival

Monophonics singer will make a stop in the PNW as part of his debut solo album tour.

The seventh annual Timber! Outdoor Music Festival returns July 11-13 at Tolt-MacDonald Park in Carnation. Kelly Finnigan and The Atonements will be performing on July 12.

Finnigan, lead singer of Monophonics, recently released his first solo album, “The Tales People Tell,” through Colemine Records. Finnigan and The Atonements have been on tour since the album’s release in the spring.

The LA-based singer, songwriter, engineer and producer grew up around music and has been passionate about music since an early age.

For Finnigan, he said he started writing and recording songs without really thinking about it.

“I knew I wanted to work in the music industry ever since I was about 14 years old,” he said. “[With music,] I like to dissect things and peel back the layers…it’s one of the things that made [the music] special.”

Finnigan has been working on his debut solo album for almost two years.

Unlike other artists who intentionally set out to create a solo album, Finnigan said that wasn’t the case for him.

“It wasn’t a consistent process,” he said.

Finnigan said he’s used to writing and collaborating with other artists, but this album came together over a longer period of time of him just writing what he wanted to write.

Finnigan said he feels the album is “definitely” him.

“I had full creative control, I recorded and mixed it myself…every decision was mine,” he said.

For Finnigan, he said he tries to color outside the lines in terms of classic soul and funk music. However, this album is more “straight on” soul.

“I consciously made it soul,” he said. “I felt this building inside me and I just needed to get it out of me…I think I can offer the skills to do [soul music] justice.”

Over the nearly two years of working on the album, Finnigan said he didn’t experience many challenges while creating the album. He said one of the things that was challenging was working on the album from afar and finishing the final mixes.

Since the album’s release, he said he’s been overwhelmed by the positive responses and encouragement he’s received.

“It’s been great to hear that people really like the album,” he said. “People young and old and everywhere in between are enjoying it…they’re sharing stories and it’s hitting them.”

With that, Finnigan said he’s proud to have created something that can be passed on. He said he’s also proud to have created something himself.

“I got to wear multiple hats…record producer, artist…I got to look inside myself as an artist,” he said.

For more information about Finnigan visit his website. For more information about Timber! Outdoor Music Festival or to purchase tickets, visit the website.

Kelly Finnigan will perform at Carnation’s Timber! Outdoor Music Festival on July 12. Photo by Whitney Pelfrey

Kelly Finnigan will perform at Carnation’s Timber! Outdoor Music Festival on July 12. Photo by Whitney Pelfrey

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