Council approves funding for snow storm recovery and history museum

Council approves funding for snow storm recovery and history museum

Council approved expenses accrued responding to snow storm clean up and new Lodging Tax funding.

The Snoqualmie City Council voted to approve expenses accrued while responding to the February snow storm, received a presentation suggesting the renaming of Meadowbrook Avenue, and approved additional lodging tax funding for two new projects.

At the May 28 meeting, the Snoqualmie City Council received a presentation from Mount Si High School ASB students proposing a street name change to coincide with the completion of the new school opening this fall. The students’ goal is to pair school spirit and community identity with infrastructure.

The proposal would have the name Wildcat Way either replace or exist alongside Meadowbrook Way Southeast from Railroad Avenue to Southeast Park Street.

The council was not able to take action on the proposal, but it sent the proposal to the Planning Commission for further consideration. Mayor Matt Larson expected the student group will reform when the next school year starts to continue conversations around the name change.

The city also approved the administration’s use of funds in clearing dangerous road conditions this past winter. A state of emergency was declared by the mayor, which allowed the city to use additional resources to address safety and access throughout the city as soon as possible.

The council approved an ordinance amending the budget to reflect the total of $268,031 spent in the recovery process. The cost summary breaks down each company paid, the service they provided, and the number of invoices received. The three most expensive services on the list were $73,635 for de-icing, $38,152 for sand hauling and snow removal, and $22,835 for additional snow removal. Staff overtime, double time and benefits were also a large element of the total cost, coming in at $93,166 combined.

Lodging Tax funding was also approved for the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum and the City of Snoqualmie itself for two new projects. The museum received $2,177 for the “Go Wildcats” exhibit, featuring a history of Mount Si High School. Additionally, $8,786 was approved for city use to replace the damaged doors to the kiosk on the downtown boardwalk. The doors are described as beyond repair. The city council also unanimously approved the requests.




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