COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)

Regency North Bend outbreak leaves four dead

A large outbreak of COVID-19 at Regency North Bend, a senior living facility, was confirmed by Seattle & King County Public Health officials on Nov. 25.

The coronavirus outbreak has killed four residents, and at least 24 of the 42 residents have contracted the virus. Staff has not been spared either, with at least 23 of the facility’s 55 staff members testing positive. These numbers were updated on Dec. 1.

King County operates a dashboard detailing cases at licensed long-term care facilities in the county. It is updated on Thursdays, and as of Wednesday, Nov. 25, the dashboard did not reflect the outbreak.

An in-person inspection was conducted on Nov. 24. Public Health and the Washington State Department of Health made several recommendations.

They included training staff on how to wear N95 masks correctly and how to conduct seal checks, audit staff compliance with using personal protective equipment and ensuring that staff and outside contractors adhere to protective gear usage requirements.

All residents doors must remain closed unless it is unsafe to do so. Staff must further ensure social distancing, and the facility must consult with an airflow specialist for guidance on how to optimize air flow.

Regency has not responded to a request for comment.

This story will be updated as more information becomes available.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in News

West Point Wastewater Treatment Plant. Photo courtesy of Washington Department of Ecology.
EPA loans King County $96.8 million to prevent untreated water from spilling into Puget Sound

Loan comes a week after an over 10 million gallon overflow into the Puget Sound and Lake Washington.

Chief Andy De Los Angeles. Courtesy photo
Chief Andy De Los Angeles of the Snoqualmie Tribe has died

Chief Andy De Los Angeles of the Snoqualmie Tribe has died today.… Continue reading

National Guard troops, pictured Jan. 11 at the state Capitol in Olympia, have been on standby in case of violent protests. (Photo by Roger Harnack, Cheney Free Press)
At the state Capitol, a quiet day amid heightened security

There were no protests or arrests as troopers patrolled and the National Guard assumed a lower profile.

West Point Treatment Plant in Seattle. Photo courtesy of King County
Power outages cause massive wastewater spill into Puget Sound, Lake Washington

King County estimates millions gallons of untreated wastewater overflowed into surrounding waters.

Democrats in the Washington State House are proposing to pay for transportation improvements partly by raising the gas tax by 18 cents. (Sound Publishing file photo)
House Democrats lay out massive $26B transportation package funded by gas tax hike

An 18-cent gas tax increase and a fee on carbon emissions would fund new roads and more.

File photo
Report: 70 percent of gun deaths in Washington are attributable to suicide

Research done at The Firearm Injury and Policy Research Program at Harborview… Continue reading

Photo courtesy of the Northwest Railway Museum
Northwest Railway Museum: Train rides and shed update

The Northwest Railway Museum is happy to announce that winter train rides… Continue reading

June 2018 algae bloom. Photo courtesy of Department of Ecology
Human-caused ‘dead zones’ threaten health of Puget Sound

Wastewater treatment plants account for about 70% of the excess nutrients.

Robert Allen, 61, had never been homeless in his life before 2019, when he lost his housing. The chef has been trying to get back on his feet, and hopes to open a nonprofit and make hot sauce. File photo
King County implements 0.01% sales tax to raise money for housing the homeless

Officials plan to buy hotels, motels and nursing homes for conversion into permanent housing.

Most Read