Air quality worsens from wildfires

City advises residents to protect themselves from poor air quality.

  • Wednesday, August 15, 2018 12:30pm
  • News

The greater Puget Sound region, including the upper Snoqualmie Valley, is experiencing unhealthy air quality due to smoke from wildfires in Washington and British Columbia. Air quality monitoring shows air quality at unhealthy levels in the Cascade foothills.

Outdoor smoke contains very small particles and gases, including carbon monoxide. These particles can get into eyes and lungs where they can cause health problems, especially for those in high-risk categories including infants and children, individuals over age 65, pregnant women, and those with asthma, lung disease, heart disease, respiratory infections, or diabetes.

The Washington State Department of Health has the following tips for dealing with outdoor smoke.

  • Avoid physical exertion outdoors.
  • Stay indoors when possible.
  • Keep windows and doors closed.
  • If there is no air conditioning and it is too hot to keep windows and doors closed, consider going to an air-conditioned public location. See local options below.
  • If you have an air conditioner, set it to re-circulate and close the fresh-air intake. Make sure to change the filter regularly. Use a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to reduce indoor air pollution.
  • Keep indoor air as clean as possible. Don’t use candles, fireplaces, or gas stoves. Avoid vacuuming as it stirs up particles already inside your home. Don’t smoke.
  • Check on elderly neighbors.

For more information about air quality from the current wildfires, visit the Washington Smoke Information website.

Locations to Avoid Smoke and Cool Off

Cool off and avoid the smoke for a few hours or more in the following locations: Local public libraries, Snoqualmie Valley YMCA, Snoqualmie Valley Hospital, Mt. Si Senior Center, North Bend Umpqua Bank Meeting Room.

Transportation to these public facilities is available throughout the Snoqualmie Valley by Snoqualmie Valley Transportation (SVT) for only $1 per ride for ages 13 and up. Information about SVT services is at www.svtbus.org.

More in News

VoteWA is a $9.5 million program that came online last May and is meant to unify all 39 county voting systems in the state into a single entity. Courtesy image
WA’s new voting system concerns county elections officials

VoteWA has run into some problems in recent months as the Aug. 6 primary election draws closer.

City Council approves EMS contract for Echo Glen center

Annual revenue agreement is for $16,578.

Si View Metro Parks make progress on aquatics facility plan

Si View Metro Parks is expecting the Aquatics Center Feasibility Study to be finished in August.

File photo
                                Richard Burhans with Sinacia Yovanovich at the Euro Lounge Cafe and crepe restaurant in downtown North Bend.
Valley artist honored for lifetime work

Richard Burhans is the man behind many of the Valley’s notable murals.

An aerial photo shows the locations of two earthquakes and five aftershocks in and near Monroe, which rattled the Puget Sound region early Friday. The first was the magnitude 4.6 quake at upper right, 13 miles under the intersection of U.S. 2 and Fryelands Boulevard SE at 2:51 a.m. The second, magnitude 3.5, occurred 18 miles under the Old Snohomish-Monroe Road at 2:53 a.m. The aftershocks followed during the ensuing two hours. This image depicts an area about 3 miles wide. (Herald staff and the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network)
Early wake-up call: Twin quakes under Monroe rattle region

Thousands of people felt them. They were magnitude 4.6 and 3.5 and hit minutes apart.

Courtesy photo
King County Sheriff’s Office has been giving ICE unredacted information

Both the office and jail have supplied the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency.

‘Feedback loops’ of methane, CO2 echo environmental problem beyond Washington

University of Washington among researchers of climate change’s effects in global temperatures.

Caller upset over stolen bong | Police Blotter

Police blotter for June 29 - July 4.

Warning sign for a road closure. File photo
King County examines options to fund roads and bridges

Shortfall is roughly $250 million each year; county may seek tax from unincorporated voters.

Most Read