Meet Crisis Connections: The Real Connection between Seattle’s Crisis Clinic and the Community

Stress – many of us are all too familiar with this word. Everyone experiences stress. However, sometimes, what seems like everyday responsibilities can shape into something overwhelming – becoming a lot to bear for one person alone. The folks at Crisis Clinic get that, and they know the difference that can be made through one connection.

On Aug. 1, 1963, a tragic incident occurred where a young girl was stabbed. After learning that this individual had reached out for help days before the event, the family believed this tragedy could have been avoided if he had somewhere he could have turned to for support. In 1964, the young girl’s family began Crisis Clinic as a way of offering a solution for those experiencing a crisis.

Crisis Clinic currently operates one of the oldest crisis lines in the nation, servicing Seattle and the surrounding areas. Over the years, their programs have expanded to meet the needs of callers. In addition to the 24-Hour Crisis Line, Crisis Clinic currently operates King County 2-1-1, Teen Link, Washington Recovery Help Line and Washington Warm Line. They connect people to support, resources and training that can be of help before, during and after a crisis.

When evaluating their role in the community, the team learned that their name doesn’t reflect all of the work they now do. As a resource of connection for anyone experiencing any crisis, they help people navigate resources in health and human services, find support through a listening ear, and equip those experiencing suicidal or homicidal thoughts with the tools they need to stay safe.

After consulting with staff, volunteers, the board of trustees and partners to hear how they defined Crisis Clinic, the word “connection” kept shining through. With careful decision, Crisis Clinic made the decision to embrace their expansion, while also honoring their history by rebranding their organization. As of July, Crisis Clinic is now known as Crisis Connections.

Despite the name change, their heart is the same as it always has been. Their passion is caring and listening; empowering people to make positive life changes in the face of adversity. With over 260,000 total calls to Crisis Connections in 2017, their work is driven by volunteers – many who have their own lived experiences and can connect to callers more deeply as a result.

“The cure to isolation,” says executive director Allie Franklin, “is connection. When you’re feeling hopeless, we have hope to share.”

Crisis Connections has always been about connection, and they continue to be committed to providing excellent service to everyone who reaches out to them. Learn more about their story, their mission and their programs by visiting www.crisisconnections.org.


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