Volunteer Emergency Medical Service and Firefighters were recognized for their contribution to the city on April 10. From left, back row: Justin Venezia, Catherine Cotton, Mayor Matt Larson, Sara York, Tyson Adams, Thomas Walker, Paul Marrero, Robert Angrisano, Greg Prothman. Front row: Volunteer EMS Lorrie Jones, with Phoebe the Dog. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Volunteer Emergency Medical Service and Firefighters were recognized for their contribution to the city on April 10. From left, back row: Justin Venezia, Catherine Cotton, Mayor Matt Larson, Sara York, Tyson Adams, Thomas Walker, Paul Marrero, Robert Angrisano, Greg Prothman. Front row: Volunteer EMS Lorrie Jones, with Phoebe the Dog. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Snoqualmie honors the time and dedication offered by city volunteers

The time and effort many citizens put into making the city a better place was recognized on Wednesday, April 10, as the city of Snoqualmie held its annual volunteer recognition event at the The Club (TPC) at Snoqualmie Ridge.

The volunteer recognition event has been an annual city celebration for about a decade, city clerk Jodi Warren said. More than 90 volunteers received recognition for the dedication they put into work for the city.

“If you count the number of hours that our volunteers put in and the value to the citizens of those hours, this is just a small token to let them know we really appreciate it,” she said.

Volunteers from across the city were recognized for their work as they were called to the stage by Mayor Matt Larson to accept a certificate. Volunteers at the event included representatives of the Arts Commission, Economic Development Commission, Snoqualmie Fire Department, Emergency Medical Service, Lodging Tax Advisory Committee, Human Service Committee, Salary Commission, Shoreline Hearings Board, Parks and Events Commission, Planning Commission, Police Department, Police Explorers program, SEACAST, as well as individuals like historian Dave Battey and Pastor Marty Benedict.

Volunteers also were honored for the length of their volunteer work for the city. All of the volunteers stood up and sat down as the mayor called out years of service. Slowly counting up to more than 10 years of service, people took their seats until there were only three left. Carol Peterson, Gloria McNeely and Duane John received applause for each contributing more than 20 years of volunteer effort to the city. Johnson said he had more than 20 years of volunteer work, while both Peterson and McNeely had contributed to their community for about 40 years.

Live entertainment also was provided with a performance by magician Jeff Evans, incorporating both the children and adults in his show.

The city partnered with the TPC at Snoqualmie Ridge for the venue and with various local businesses to fund dinner for the family members of the volunteers. Because the city is not able to pay for the families of volunteers out of city money, businesses donated to pay for their dinner. Warren said the city received $1,250 in donations for attendance of non-volunteer guests.

Recognizing the amount of time put in by citizens to contribute to their community is important, Warren said, which is why the event has become an annual tradition.

“Volunteers are Snoqualmie’s treasures,” she said.

The three citizens with the longest records of volunteer work for the city of Snoqualmie receive stand and receive applause for their decades of effort. From left, Gloria McNeely, Carol Peterson, and Duane Johnson. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The three citizens with the longest records of volunteer work for the city of Snoqualmie receive stand and receive applause for their decades of effort. From left, Gloria McNeely, Carol Peterson, and Duane Johnson. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The Arts Commission was the first group to be called to the stage at the recognition event. From left: Mayor Matt Larson, Sam Insalaco, Sally Mayo, Gloria McNeely, Sally Rackets. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The Arts Commission was the first group to be called to the stage at the recognition event. From left: Mayor Matt Larson, Sam Insalaco, Sally Mayo, Gloria McNeely, Sally Rackets. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Magician Jeff Evans invites Audrey McDonald, 4, to the stage to prepare for a magic trick. After the recognition event, Evans performed his routine for the audience of volunteers and their families. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Magician Jeff Evans invites Audrey McDonald, 4, to the stage to prepare for a magic trick. After the recognition event, Evans performed his routine for the audience of volunteers and their families. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

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