Putting a human face on immigration issues Movie review: ‘La Misma Luna’

I recently saw a wonderful film in Seattle and am thrilled that it will soon be shown at the North Bend Theatre.

  • Wednesday, April 30, 2008 6:00am
  • Life

I recently saw a wonderful film in Seattle and am thrilled that it will soon be shown at the North Bend Theatre.

This movie is called “La Misma Luna,” or “Under the Same Moon,” and it puts human faces that you can’t help but love on the problems of immigration.

Adrian Alonso is absolutely adorable as the star. He plays nine-year-old Carlitos with the perfect balance of childhood charm, big-hearted spirit and wisdom beyond his years. But Alonso never lets you forget that he’s a little boy.

Every Sunday at 10 a.m. sharp, Carlitos excitedly waits for the pay phone to ring. It’s the lifeline that connects him, living in Mexico, with his mother, Rosario, who works in East Los Angeles and sends the family $300 each month. He hasn’t seen her for four years.

Fortunately, Carlitos lives in a vibrant Mexican village with a loving grandmother who refuses to put the young boy into harm’s way, despite his pleas to let a novice (America Ferrera of “Ugly Betty”) smuggle him across the border. The death of his grandmother changes everything.

With a handful of savings and a return address ripped off a letter from his mother, Carlitos sets off to find her. Tense moments alternate with funny incidents. The humor really kicks in when the boy’s seemingly impossible journey to the L.A. barrios becomes a buddy movie. A surly migrant loner, Enrique, reluctantly travels with the optimistic Carlitos.

The Grammy-winning band, Los Tigres del Norte, appear in one scene, telling a courageous story through song. Even when Carlitos seems most lost, nothing is more satisfying than the moment when the precocious little boy and his devoted mother are under the same moon, in the same place.

Don’t miss this wonderful film.

“La Misma Luna” shows May 2 to May 9 at the North Bend Theatre. Showtimes are 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday, 7 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. Tickets are $5. Rating: PG-13 for some mature thematic elements. In English and Spanish with English subtitles.

• Vi Walker is a 23-year North Bend resident who works in Seattle and volunteers as a teacher for Hopelink.


In consideration of how we voice our opinions in the modern world, we’ve closed comments on our websites. We value the opinions of our readers and we encourage you to keep the conversation going.

Please feel free to share your story tips by emailing editor@valleyrecord.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.valleyrecord.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) We reserve the right to edit letters, but if you keep yours to 300 words or less, we won’t ask you to shorten it.

More in Life

Courtesy photo. Scott Brittain and his son Ryker at Blake’s Pizzeria in Carnation (before state regulations for COVID-19 mandated restaurants switch to takeout only). Scott has been a customer since he was a kid, and now he and his family are still regulars.
In Carnation, Blake’s carries on with carryout

Community supports local pizzeria during COVID-19 pandemic.

Savannah Lynn and Will Chadek in the Second Story Repertory of Redmond’s production of “The Fantasticks.” “The Fantasticks” had been performed three times by the organization until coronavirus concerns resulted in the cancellation of the remaining dates. Photo by Michael Brunk
How is the coronavirus affecting the arts?

Representatives from Eastside arts institutions discuss their experiences.

A GoFundMe page has been set up for the Ralphs family after their home along the Raging River was yellow-tagged. Photo courtesy of Friends of the Ralphs Family GoFundMe page
Family of four forced to leave home along Raging River in Preston

Erosion has deemed the house yellow-tagged by King County services.

Courtesy photo
                                The Snoqualmie Valley Evergreens 4-H club will host a rabbit show on Feb. 29 in North Bend.
4-H rabbit show on Feb. 29 in North Bend

The show is open to the public. There is no admission for spectators.

Courtesy photo
                                North Bend Mayor Rob McFarland (R) presents the 2019 Citizen of the Year award to North Bend resident Beth Burrows at the city’s Feb. 4, 2020 council meeting.
North Bend’s Citizen of the Year

Beth Burrows recognized for outstanding contributions to the community.

Making a human connection in a sea of social media

A monthly health column about natural medicine.

(Pixabay photo)
Master Gardeners workshop on Feb. 15

Topics include soil, food and climate change.

The archway at last year’s Relay For Life of Snoqualmie Valley event. Courtesy photo
Relay For Life of Snoqualmie Valley kickoff

Dessert auction event Feb. 1.

Award-winning play ‘The Good Adoptee’ coming to Mercer Island

The autobiographical drama was penned by acclaimed playwright Suzanne Bachner.

Embrace the struggle for a complete picture | Health column

A monthly column about mindfulness and general wellbeing.