Berry Rogers gave the raffle prize he won to fellow veteran and a personal influence, Harley Brumbaugh. More photos on Page 3. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Berry Rogers gave the raffle prize he won to fellow veteran and a personal influence, Harley Brumbaugh. More photos on Page 3. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Mount Si Senior Center honors veterans at annual luncheon

Local veterans gathered at Mount Si Senior Center for the annual Veterans Day celebration.

Many of the Valley’s veterans gathered at Mount Si Senior Center for the annual Veterans Day celebration and lunch on Monday, Nov. 12.

Veterans and their friends and family joined North Bend Mayor Ken Hearing and Snoqualmie Valley Methodist Church Pastor Lee Carney Hartman at the senior center for a lunch that was sponsored and paid for entirely by a member of the community who preferred to be anonymous.

Boy Scout Troop 466 color guard began the event and local musician Carol Mukhalian played the national anthem on piano as the event attendees and speakers sang along.

Hartman spoke to the crowd about the history and meaning of Veterans Day, including its past as Armistice Day before being renamed in 1954. She spoke about honoring all veterans and their unique experiences — those who are proud and those who remain haunted by their service. Hartman also led a prayer for the veterans as well.

The Mount Si Senior Center Yarn Therapy Group raffled off a special blanket at the event. Berry Rogers, scout master of Boy Scout Troop 466, won the blanket, but as he made his way to the podium to accept the prize, he announced that he wanted to give it to a veteran who has also been a longtime bandleader in the Valley, Harley Brumbaugh.


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Local veterans attended the lunch to honor other veterans in their community. From left: Tim Lake, Dave Lake, Walt Wyrsch, Cathy Brumbaugh, Harley Brumbaugh. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo.

Local veterans attended the lunch to honor other veterans in their community. From left: Tim Lake, Dave Lake, Walt Wyrsch, Cathy Brumbaugh, Harley Brumbaugh. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo.

The Boy Scout Troop 466 members Ben and Adam Rogers began the event with the color guard ceremony. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The Boy Scout Troop 466 members Ben and Adam Rogers began the event with the color guard ceremony. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The crowd signs the national anthem at Mount Si Senior Center’s annual Veterans Day lunch. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

The crowd signs the national anthem at Mount Si Senior Center’s annual Veterans Day lunch. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Carol Mukhalian played the national anthem as the luncheon’s guest sang the lyrics. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Carol Mukhalian played the national anthem as the luncheon’s guest sang the lyrics. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

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