Letters to the Editor, Sept. 21

Letters to the Editor from the Sept. 21 issue.

Attacks on Dr. Schrier are hypocritical

The “dark-money” attack ad on congressional candidate Dr. Kim Schrier is insulting and hypocritical. Produced by Republican Paul Ryan’s “political action committee,” they think voters are stupid enough to believe Dr. Schrier is a rich, greedy pediatrician.

The hypocrisy is mind bending. Ryan loves Ayn Rand, who proselytized selfishness, calling Jesus immoral. Ryan and Republicans want to kill Obamacare, Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security. Ryan doesn’t care about children on Medicaid.

Negative ads aim to suppress the vote of the opposition party. Why vote if Schrier is just as greedy as Rossi?

Dr. Schrier is brilliant and became a pediatrician to help children. If motivated by greed, she could have made more money selling real estate.

Months ago, I chatted with Dr. Schrier after a public meeting. As we left, she said, “Your shoelace is untied” and kneeled to tie my shoe. She didn’t want to see an old guy — me — trip. A spontaneous act of care which speaks volumes about her character.

The truth is Dr. Schrier cares deeply about people’s health.

The truth is Dr. Schrier does not have a private practice, and works for Virgina-Mason who sets the percentage of Medicaid patients they will take.

The truth is Dr. Schrier has a plan to negotiate lower drug prices and to offer a public option based on Medicare.

The truth is Dr. Schrier wants everyone to have health care.

More dishonest attack-ads are coming. Don’t be fooled.

Roger Ledbetter

Snoqualmie


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