Order your Thanksgiving box of locally-grown food from Snoqualmie Valley Farmers Cooperative

  • Wednesday, October 25, 2017 10:41am
  • Business

When Farmer Matt Tregoning of Sol to Seed Farm helped found the Snoqualmie Valley Farmers Cooperative, he had a clear vision. “We wanted to help new, small farmers in our valley reach eaters.”

This year, the co-op will continue its Thanksgiving box tradition to further that goal. The box feeds six to eight people and includes recipes and nearly all ingredients needed to make seven side dishes and a pie. Local, pasture-raised turkeys are also available.

“The Thanksgiving box showcases the diversity of things grown in our valley, which we are really proud of,” Tregoning says. “It even includes local flour for your pumpkin pie!”

The menu includes roasted roots, delicata squash fries, brown butter kale, as well as traditional favorites such as cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. All produce is from the Snoqualmie Valley and everything is from within 170 miles. Order a Thanksgiving box at www.snovalleycoop.com/thanksgiving-box.

Snoqualmie Valley Farmers Cooperative now includes 23 farms that work together to market and deliver their vegetables throughout the greater Seattle area.

“The promise of the co-op is efficiency,” explains SVFC General Manager Hannah Cavendish-Palmer. “The farms in our valley are small and it makes sense for them to work together. If the co-op can take care of distribution and marketing, our farmers have more time to farm.”

Environmentally responsible farming practices brought these farms together. “These farmers feel so strongly about protecting the environment that they wrote their own healthy planet pledge,” says Cavendish-Palmer.

The pledge goes beyond organic growing methods and includes labor and animal welfare practices as well.

In addition to the Thanksgiving boxes, the cooperative runs a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program and sales to restaurants, hospitals, and schools.

More in Business

People enjoying the view of Snoqualmie Falls and the Salish Lodge Spa in the sunshine on Feb. 19, 2020. Natalie DeFord/staff photo
Snoqualmie mayor, tribal chairman spar over House bill

HB 2230 would amend tribal property tax exemption.

Courtesy photo
                                Dr. James Stirrett at Bluewater Medical, his new business on Snoqualmie Ridge.
Bluewater Medical opens on Snoqualmie Ridge

New clinic offers naturopathic regenerative medicine.

Courtesy photo
                                New Snoqualmie Casino Interim CEO and President Stanford Le.
Meet Snoqualmie Casino’s new interim CEO and president

Stanford Le brings international casino management experience into the position.

Business perspective for the new year

A monthly business column from a local financial adviser.

Eager buyers plentiful but choices were meager

The real estate market by the numbers for December 2019.

A new decade begins with low inventory in housing market | Real Estate column

A monthly real estate snapshot by John L. Scott Real Estate.

New informational displays adorn the kiosk near the Snoqualmie Depot, depicting a walking tour of the Historic Downtown and its events. The design was created by local artist Kat Marshello. Photo courtesy of the City of Snoqualmie’s website.
New kiosk displays guide Historic Downtown Snoqualmie walk

Artowork, map helps visitors learn tales of the town.

Finding your proverbial strawberries | Business column

A monthly business column from Mercer Island financial adviser Bob Toomey.

Decreased inventory for buyers in local real estate market

A monthly real estate snapshot by John L. Scott Real Estate.

Boeing Renton plant to halt 737 Max production

Suspension expected to begin in January

Business alliance serves women of African diaspora in King County

Nourah Yonous launched the African Women Business Alliance in 2017 to find ways to lift women up.

Bob Toomey
Lessons in long-term planning from an anniversary

A column from a financial adviser.