Seth Truscott

Snoqualmie tries new trash times to discourage hungry bears

Snoqualmie’s city council introduced an ordinance tweaking the rules governing garbage containers and bears. In Snoqualmie, garbage containers must be stored unless they are bear-resistant. The new law changes the times that garbage cans can be rolled out for pickup and when they must be brought back inside.

A day at the market: Farmer’s expo not over yet at Si View | Photo Gallery

Summer’s not over yet. The North Bend Farmer’s Market continues to draw vendors, shoppers, playful children and peppy music acts to the green at Si View Park. The market runs 4 to 8 p.m. every Thursday at the park, 400 S.E. Orchard Drive. Two more dates await this season, Sept. 4 and 11.

Demystify the process of government: Join the Snoqualmie Citizens Academy

Have you ever really thought about how your city works? Where it gets its revenues? How it spends them? Who runs the city, who keeps your streets safe and water flowing? If you’ve ever been mystified by the process of government, prepare to be demystified.

Know your EFR from your VAP: What do all those Valley acronyms mean?

A man who called our office last week had some words for us. Words about letters. “I’ve lived here forever,” said the local. He’s noticed how the Valley Record typically refers to the TPC Snoqualmie Ridge golf course using its acronym, and told us he didn’t know what the acronym means. Nobody that he knows knew what it means. Keep that in mind, he told us.

Valley pilot snaps high art from 1,000 feet | Photo Gallery

Gabhan Berry has the kind of view on the Valley most folks never get—out the open window of an airplane. “I have a different perspective on things,” says the Carnation-based aerial photographer. From the sky, he encounters familiar surroundings, but sees them in a new way.

Learning from the greats: Chip Beck grows the next generation of golf at Boeing Classic’s Emirates Youth Clinic | Photo Gallery

Budding Snoqualmie golfer Kasey Maralack is only 10 years old, and she is already finding success in the game. Last Tuesday, Aug. 19, she got a big lesson in thinking positive from one of the greats of the game. Maralack hit the green with golf pro Chip Beck for some pro tips at the Emirates Youth Clinic, one of several family-oriented activities that took place last week as part of the 10th annual Boeing Classic at TPC Snoqualmie Ridge.

Walking the talk: Mount Si football coach Kinnune is Railroad Days grand marshal

Charlie Kinnune’s gravelly voice rings out across Mount Si stadium. With a command here, a compliment there, a gentle ribbing for one elementary-age boy with his hands in his pockets, a fist-bump for a young girl doing well in drills, he’s bringing up a future generation of high school athletes.

Thank you, ‘Rise and Shine’ volunteers

For 18 years, the Snoqualmie Valley Community Network has been giving an annual high five to the folks who really make the Valley work: The volunteers, teachers, coaches, go-getting students and parents who form the fabric of community.

Snoqualmie tax will roll over for roads fix; Council seeks funding for aging infrastructure

Snoqualmie’s City Council has found a funding source for needed road improvements. Now they just need to pay off city hall. The council voted 5-2 to approve an ordinance repealing the scheduled sunset of a 3 percent utility tax that is now paying for the 2009 construction of city hall.

Ready for anything: Former Snoqualmie mayor Fuzzy Fletcher goes into the disaster preparedness business

Randy “Fuzzy” Fletcher is not out to scare you. He just wants to make you think, and better yet, make a plan. Fletcher, the former mayor of Snoqualmie, and his wife, Rebecca Bastian, recently went into business as Fletcher Consulting, offering disaster preparedness for businesses and families. They have operated the business since October out of their Maple Avenue home in Snoqualmie, offering everything from five-day kits to generator installation to plans for keeping a company up and running in a disaster.

Hospital future: Discussion time begins for Overlake sale, you can be a part

King County Public Hospital District No. 4’s Commissioners are elected by the people, and their role is provide access to good health care in this Valley. For 30 years, they’ve done that through a building, a team and an identity: In short, our own Snoqualmie Valley Hospital. And through good times and bad, through challenges and recessions and expansion plans, a locally run hospital has been a fact of life, a certainty.

Here we go again: Businesses navigating Snoqualmie’s downtown construction, Phase 2

After a hot, busy Saturday with Thomas the Tank Engine, the grown-ups were navigating their way along the road construction tape and finding Sigillo Cellars. “Some parents were definitely ready for a little wine,” said Vicki Curnutt, tasting room manager at Sigillo tasting room. The Northwest Railway Museum’s big family excursion gave downtown Snoqualmie businesses a much-needed business boost, right before road construction goes into full swing.

George’s Legacy: Celebrate the 50th anniversary of George’s Bakery at the Block Party

George Macris loved his city. There is no doubt that if George were alive today, he’d be all over the North Bend Block Party, selling cookies and bread, or mingling with the crowd. Probably both.

Survivors and caregivers walk, smile, cry and find hope at Snoqualmie Valley Relay for Life cancer benefit | Photo Gallery

Everybody had a reason to be there. For cancer survivor Dave Sharpy, those reasons have names, starting with his friends Sharon Larson and Tall Bill Blakely, who he lost in the last year to cancer. “Yesterday, my stepdaughter started her chemotherapy,” said Sharpy, among the survivors and supporters who shared their experience at the 2014 Snoqualmie Valley Relay for Life. “She’s going to be going through that struggle. Once again, I have a new reason to Relay.”

Survey points to new season for school bond

Snoqualmie Valley School District is currently deep in the thorny thicket of bond planning, hoping to come up with a measure to build a new Valley school. It’s been 11 years since voters in Snoqualmie, North Bend and Fall City passed a measure building a real, brick-and-mortar school, as opposed to portables. The district’s latest survey sheds some light on why we have such trouble passing a bond.

Snoqualmie Valley Hospital may go to Overlake | District exploring autumn sale

The foundation is poured, the walls are up and the tower cap freshly lifted in place at what, for now, is the future Snoqualmie Valley Hospital. When it opens, however, the new hospital may be a branch of Bellevue’s Overlake Hospital Medical Center. King County Public Hospital District No. 4, the rural district centered on Snoqualmie, is considering selling its hospital and clinics to Overlake. The district’s board of commissioners approved a letter of intent to negotiate a sale at their Thursday, July 3, regular meeting.

Health trumps honey when Valley beekeepers domesticate wild Carnation colony | Photo Gallery

Jerri Johnson walks right up to the hives, abuzz with hundreds of thousands of bees. No mask. No gloves. No bee suit. And he’s as calm as can be. “We’re in harmony,” says Johnson, who keeps four hives in his sprawling Snoqualmie garden. “I would never be a threat to them. They’re not a threat to me. I can get just as close as I want.” Like any beekeeper, Johnson occasionally gets stung. The last time was a few hours ago. It didn’t faze him, and he approaches one busy hive without mask or gloves to make a point: that these wild bees are pretty cool.

Be safe and smart this Fourth of July | Opinion

The Fourth of July is a time for parades, barbecues—and loud bangs. Fireworks are a time-honored American tradition on the Fourth, but one accompanying tradition that I tire of is when people don’t follow the rules, and wind up bothering their neighbors, making a big mess, and hurting themselves or others. There were 45 fireworks related fires and 54 injuries reported in King County in 2013—down from 70 fires and 51 injuries in 2012.

Bonded by water: North Bend’s Dave Olson explores bravery in three-generation memoir

Bravely voyaging into uncharted waters is the common thread that links North Bend resident Dave Olson’s life to three generations of his family. Olson explores how he, his father, the Reverend Roy Olson, his brother Ken, and his daughter Jenifer each took paths less traveled, and changed lives around them, in his new book, part memoir, part anthology.

Find the courage: Two Rivers School’s Class of 2014 overcomes challenges to complete its academic journey | Photo Gallery

A young mother with a 1-year-old baby, Sarah Webb didn’t have a driver’s license. But she did have a bike. So, every morning last summer, she loaded her little son, Elliott, into a trailer, then hopped on her bike for the two-mile ride to Two Rivers School. “It took some getting used to,” Webb said of the commute. “But I needed to get to school.” Webb, like many of her classmates in the Two Rivers School Class of 2014, had to face a challenge to get to this moment.