Seth Truscott

With help from many local donators and businesses

Heart of the community: Tasty, traditional eats for Fourth of July help seniors stay strong

When you bite into that saucy spaghetti or sweet shortcake on the Fourth of July, you’re taking part in a more-than-20-year civic tradition of Carnation. The Sno Valley Senior Center’s iconic pre-Fourth Spaghetti Dinner and annual Strawberry Shortcake feed on the big day are both living legacies of this place’s ongoing mission of service.

With help from many local donators and businesses

Homes and rights: No winners in fracas over affordable housing

They say good fences make for good neighbors. It’s hard to imagine a fence good enough, though, to make Imagine Housing and Eagle Pointe see eye to eye. You wouldn’t think that subsidized housing for the poor would become such a hot-button topic. After all, affordable homes for all Valley residents is an undoubtedly good thing, right? However, there really was no avoiding the nearly two-hour session on Imagine Housing’s plans that took place on May 11, at the Snoqualmie City Council—or the deeper community conversation that needs to follow.

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Shape of things to come: Mount Si football reloads for spring preview, jamboree | Slideshow

Practice had ended, but Harrison Danna wasn’t ready to go home. The Chief Kanim Middle Schooler’s arm cocked back and then whipped the football toward a waiting swarm of fellow players, all future freshmen at Mount Si High School. It was their first opportunity in 2012 to play together as a team, and the boys were excited, growing skills and making friends from elsewhere in the Valley. “It’s good to come together—all three schools,” said Danna.

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Snoqualmie's Travis Boothe

To boldly go: Green living on the blue when Snoqualmie’s Travis Boothe creates a minimized, floating hi-tech home

Twenty years ago, Travis Boothe’s home was his sailboat. He never forgot the freedom and adventure of that lifestyle. Now, with life at a crossroads, the Snoqualmie resident is taking stock of what’s really important. For him, that’s an interesting, meaningful existence. He’s about to bring his home evironment into line with that ideal, in a dramatic way. Recalling his boating days, he’s about to set sail, trading his home and much of his belongings for a houseboat on Lake Washington.

Snoqualmie's Travis Boothe
Nurturing young people’s interests in science and math

The 
role 
model: Jackie ‘of all trades’ inspires confidence 
in classroom, gym

It’s a grand, scientific surprise: Brown iodine and bags of white, starchy water are ready to mix, but what will happen is anybody’s educated guess in teacher Kate Christenson’s second grade classroom at North Bend Elementary.

Nurturing young people’s interests in science and math
The historic Moore House was the family home during Fall City resident Irene Pike’s teen years. Today

History at home: Fall City’s 108-year-old Moore House gets new era

Moonbeam and Sunshine flew the coop. The beer-drinking bear has long since departed. The families have come and gone, even the trees have aged and fallen. But Fall City’s historic Moore House is still here, better than ever in 2012. Much of the credit for that is due to Irene Pike. For the last nine years, Irene, a longtime Fall City resident, has been giving the 108-year-old Moore home a new lease on life. The Moore House has been in the Parmelee-Anderson-Pike family since the 1940s. Irene spent part of her childhood here, and so did her children. Now grown, they’ve been helping her restore the house to its rightful place as one of Fall City’s historic treasures.

The historic Moore House was the family home during Fall City resident Irene Pike’s teen years. Today
Cheryl Pflug

A new direction: Valley’s outgoing State Sen. Cheryl Pflug gets law degree, takes new job

From nurse and mother to state senator, Cheryl Pflug’s career has taken some dramatic turns. She begins a new chapter this summer, swapping her role on the senate floor for a job as one of six members of the Washington State Growth Management Hearings Board. The hearings board “is something most people haven’t heard of,” says Pflug. But the six members of the board, who weigh in on land disputes such as Snoqualmie’s Mill Area Annexation, have the power to influence how local communities and the wider state grows. After representing a district that rode the growth wave of King County, Pflug says her new job is a natural fit.

Cheryl Pflug

Breaking boundaries: In so many fields, the Valley should take pride in what its women are doing

There’s nothing that a woman can’t do. That’s what Jackie Andrewjeski says and believes, and it’s a talk that she walks daily. Andrewjeski is a personal mythbuster for anyone who’s ever thought of women as the weaker sex. Not only does she hold down a job as a fitness instructor—for both men and women—at three local fitness centers, she’s also a certified teacher with a math and science background.

Part of a rousing musical performance at Cedarcrest High School commencement on June 15

Slideshow | The moment arrives: Cedarcrest’s ‘sparkling’ Class of 2012 looks back on high school lessons, ahead to new dawn

As Cedarcrest High School’s Class of 2012 filed past, eyes firmly fixed on the future, English teacher Michelle Parish’s high-fives and smiling face gave them one last high school connection. “All these kids are hard workers,” Parish said after the last robed graduate had passed. “They’re funny. They kind of sparkle, this class. They break out in song in the middle of class. You leave the room, and they’ll end up dancing. They’re a sweet group.” As commencement ended, to the tune of The Wailers’ “Three Little Birds,” Cedarcrest’s 198 former seniors, filed out of Redmond’s Overlake Community Church for hundreds of embraces, many smiles and tears.

Part of a rousing musical performance at Cedarcrest High School commencement on June 15
Don Norman is right at home in his shop. The craftsman is the 2012 Fall City Days parade marshal.

The work of his hands: Craftsman Don Norman is Fall City Days marshal

The cherry-wood cases are freshly stained, curing in a row, and other pieces of Don Norman’s latest big project, a custom kitchen island for a Lake Stevens home, are lined up nearby. He’s set to deliver them today to the job site. Once this is done, doubtless another project will come up, like that long-delayed kitchen table restoration waiting near the door. These woodworking jobs would provide a fun challenge for a man 20 or 30 years Don’s junior. Yet, one might be surprised that a man of 82 is still this involved in the woodworking business. Then again, that’s Don’s way.

Don Norman is right at home in his shop. The craftsman is the 2012 Fall City Days parade marshal.

Opinion | County exec, Valley leaders quick to find connections

With annexations, tax shortfalls, a recession and more challenges than ever, there’s no denying the county is experiencing hard times. But there’s still some fight left in King County, if I read between the lines of Executive Dow Constantine’s replies to our questions at the Record’s recent meet-and-greet and Q&A session. When the newly-elected Constantine came here in 2010, he met locals who shared their concerns on economics, bureaucracy and mother nature. This year, at the midpoint of his tenure, Constantine was slated to visit for a local governments’ dinner. Valley Record Publisher William Shaw arranged for Constantine to make a second stop, meeting with civic and business leaders to share his thoughts on where the county stands today.

Opinion | Crimes of opportunity: Don’t panic, just prepare

I never dreamed our beat-up late-model Ford would ever pose a tempting target to a car prowler. But my wife’s gym bag under the front seat must have looked enough like a purse or laptop bag for an opportunistic thief to smash, grab and dash over the Memorial Day weekend. The experience left me and my wife feeling angry, victimized and a bit mad at ourselves for leaving goods in harm’s way.

North Bend Liquor Store employee Lori Laughren straightens bottles of rum on Wednesday

Last call: Era ends as Valley’s liquor stores go private, new competition begins

Customers were steady at North Bend's Liquor Store No. 179 as the clock ticked down to closing time Thursday, March 31. The shelves and stockroom, though tidy, seemed eerily empty. Tonight marks the end of Washington's 78-year state liquor monopoly, and it was a bittersweet moment for North Bend staff like Cheryl McGee and Shannon Joyce, with 14 years of experience in the liquor business between them. "There's a whole future ahead," McGee replies when she's asked by a customer what she'll do now. "Unemployment first." McGee is among the thousands of Washingtonians whose fate changes today, as the liquor industry switches from a state enterprise to a private one under the terms of Initiative 1183, approved by voters last fall. North Bend was one of the last 35 state outlets to stay open until the final moment.

North Bend Liquor Store employee Lori Laughren straightens bottles of rum on Wednesday

Opinion | The Valley is a visitor destination. Now what? (Check out our Visitor’s Guide)

Until last year, you used to find high-tech treasure hunters called 'geocachers' exploring the side wall of Sno Falls Brewing Company. A Simpsons candy keg, containing a micro-GPS transmitter, brought the cachers up to, and sometimes into the building. Hundreds of visitors signed their name on the tiny guest register in 2010—an amazing, untapped potential. The problem with Homer’s candy, and so many other attractions in the Valley, is that they’re so often below the radar. When King County Executive Dow Constantine visited two years ago, he called on the Valley to pull together and put its strengths front and center. Now, in 2012, we still have some ways to go.

Snoqualmie Police Capt. Steve McCulley says community involvement and tips helped solve graffiti vandalism at the Snoqualmie Community Park restrooms. Officers say prompt calls and local vigilance can stop graffiti.

Community cleanup: Resident help will end graffiti’s rise, police say

When teenagers spot him and start ducking out of sight, Mark Pray knows there’s trouble brewing at Torguson Park. As North Bend Parks Lead, it’s his job to keep city parks at their best. That puts Pray at odds with the perennial problem of graffiti. In Pray’s 15 years on the job in the North Bend Parks Department, he’s caught his share of taggers, from 10-year-old boys to men in their 20s who should know better.

Snoqualmie Police Capt. Steve McCulley says community involvement and tips helped solve graffiti vandalism at the Snoqualmie Community Park restrooms. Officers say prompt calls and local vigilance can stop graffiti.

Opinion | Teen talk can help make for safer grad, summer season

The images are grisly enough, even though the trauma and the scene itself isn’t real. We’ve covered the student-led mock crashes at Mount Si High School for a number of years now, but I’m perpetually amazed at what the young people there, working with local police, firefighters and parents, accomplish. It’s hard to take in the shocking, hyper-realistic scenes.

Snoqualmie vote clears way for final Old Mill annex decision; comp plan amendment proposed

The former Weyerhaeuser mill at Snoqualmie Falls is one last step away from being part of Snoqualmie city limits. Snoqualmie City Council put the final prerequisite into place Monday, May 14, with a 4-2 vote approving the interlocal agreement with King County. Passage of the resolution sealing the deal means the city can now consider a final annex ordinance, along with a change to the Snoqualmie comprehensive plan codifying a new method of annexation. Opponents, meanwhile, are fighting the issue before the state's Growth Management Hearings Board.

Graffiti’s growth needs fast, creative Valley response

The plain white surface of the alley wall along North Bend’s McClellan Street is begging for adornment. The trouble is, the ones doing all the painting are vandals. I had my eyes opened wide to the culture of graffiti and tagging during a recent walk around North Bend, courtesy of Police Chief Mark Toner. Probably like most locals, I didn’t know North Bend had a graffiti problem. It’s hard to notice the tags during the daily round. But it turns out that tagging is a lot like a secret language.

Mount Si senior Kendra Lee winds up for a pitch Tuesday

Ready to peak: Mount Si softball chemistry, defense building for postseason push | Photo gallery

Facing down a tough Juanita team, Mount Si senior pitcher Kendra Lee left it all on the field Tuesday, May 8. The game irrevocably turned the Rebels’ way in the final inning when the Rebels’ Aliah Sweere knocked a homer to bring in a runner and make the rounds herself. Notre Dame-bound ace Allie Rhodes kept Mount Si scoreless; the Rebels won 3-0. But Lee, who struck out two, and the rest of the Mount Si defense left the senior night challenge, a warm-up for the postseason, in good spirits. “This game is the game I wanted for my senior night,” Lee said. “This is the team I wanted to play. This fight was the one I wanted. There’s nothing more I could ask for.”

Mount Si senior Kendra Lee winds up for a pitch Tuesday

Opinion | Youth carriers are the unsung heroes of the paper

At lower left on this page, you’ll find the Record’s masthead, which names the people responsible for putting together the paper in your hands. What’s missing from that list are the unsung heroes of the paper trade: The dozens of carriers, teens and adults among them, who hit the streets weekly in every kind of weather to ensure it comes to the reader. Valley springs are serious affairs. With my tongue firmly in cheek, I’ve noticed that lately, local winters have dragged into midsummer. With all that weather to contend with, good carriers show their worth by making sure that papers get to our customers in readable condition, despite all the rain, snow, wind, ice, floods, and other obstacles of nature. We ask a lot of our carriers. To them I say, thank you for all that you do.