Carol Ladwig

Nathan Storrs gets settled in for a flight to his first internship

Defying gravity: Mount Si graduate awarded NASA internships

He didn’t get to try it, but Nathan Storrs is reasonably sure he can cancel out the effects of gravity.

Nathan Storrs gets settled in for a flight to his first internship
At a welcome ceremony for Snoqualmie's sister city visitors from Gangjin Korea

Mount Si students, Korean visitors make cultural, culinary connection

Three to a hand, two high schoolers loaded a container with raw eggs in the shell. It was the opposite of a spectacular prank, though, because Dillon and TJ, both students in Laura Tarp's culinary class, were preparing to serve a special meal to honor visiting guests from Korea.

At a welcome ceremony for Snoqualmie's sister city visitors from Gangjin Korea

State plans to sell DNR-owned garage in North Bend

Governor Christine Gregoire's goal of raising $86 million by selling 10 surplus state properties in the next two years will have an effect in North Bend. One of the properties proposed for sale is still in use, a garage and lot at 201 E. 2nd Street.

Mackenzie Kulsrud and Kelli Christopherson visit their lockers between classes at Snoqualmie Middle School. A February 8 bond would build a new SMS on Snoqualmie Ridge.

School in motion? Snoqualmie Valley voters to decide Feb. 8 on middle schools’ future

Art teacher Ruth Huschle loves her classroom in Snoqualmie Middle School. The sprawling space has plenty of storage for materials, enough surfaces to stash works in process as they dry, two computers and a printer, and room for up to 24 students to work at any one time. It's perfect for a class focusing on creative expression.

Mackenzie Kulsrud and Kelli Christopherson visit their lockers between classes at Snoqualmie Middle School. A February 8 bond would build a new SMS on Snoqualmie Ridge.

Valley school board braces for current-year budget cuts, calls on Legislature to fund education

The Snoqualmie Valley School District lost $325,000 in state funding for the current school year in December, and may lose more as a result of the current legislative session.

Doug Ostgard

Sounds of the season: Fall City jazz musician, duo puts out holiday album

Doug Ostgard played in a pit orchestra for legends like Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, and Johnny Mathis. He's been a professional musician in Las Vegas, and was part of rock band Heart's 1980 world tour. His musical career has spanned more than 30 years, but it wasn't until this year that he fulfilled a longtime dream. "I always told myself 'Some day, I'm going to make my own Christmas record,'" Ostgard said. Now, he has.

Doug Ostgard
Jack Fecker

Carnation businessman shares successes in new book

After 50 years of what he calls "business adventures," Carnation entrepreneur Jack Fecker is looking to the future. His latest book, "Becoming a Creative Entrepreneur: Your GPS to Business Success," distills the lessons he's taken from past successes in the Seattle area, into the advice, tasks, and rules today's entrepreneur will need to be successful in the future.

Jack Fecker
Ninth grader Rory Walter hefts a barbell Monday

Freshman transformation: Snoqualmie Valley teachers, administrators see growth, academic solutions in 9th grade campus

It's first lunch period at Mount Si High School, and two costumed "butt-heads" are circulating the cafeteria, counseling against tobacco use. Around the corner, a student is doing push-ups while an Army recruiter counts them off. Students are eating, talking, texting, studying. A small group of freshmen confers along one wall, and they want to clear a few things up right now. "We're not unpopular, if that's what you're thinking," Natalie Holmes announced. As for the commonly-held belief that freshman year is a stressful blur of fear and hazing, "That's a lie."

Ninth grader Rory Walter hefts a barbell Monday
Jeanne Fowler of Snoqualmie loads groceries into her Jeep Cherokee

Out of work: Families on long-term unemployment turn resourceful in face of challenges

Christmas didn't happen for Will and Carla Neiss of Snoqualmie. No money, so no parties, no tree, no gifts, no travel. "We got a wreath on the door, at least," said Will, wistfully. "We just can't do the things we want to do right now."

Jeanne Fowler of Snoqualmie loads groceries into her Jeep Cherokee
Mike Bartholomew of North Bend picks up logs blocking the center turn lane of the Hwy 202 bridge in Fall City Tuesday morning. The log truck tipped over because a U-bolt in the suspension broke as the southbound truck was turning west onto the roundabout. No one was injured.

Log truck topples on Fall City’s Highway 202 bridge

A fully-loaded log truck tipped over onto the Highway 202 bridge in Fall City just before 9 a.m. Tuesday morning, blocking traffic and closing the bridge for about two hours.

Mike Bartholomew of North Bend picks up logs blocking the center turn lane of the Hwy 202 bridge in Fall City Tuesday morning. The log truck tipped over because a U-bolt in the suspension broke as the southbound truck was turning west onto the roundabout. No one was injured.

Capsized canoer rescued from freezing Rattlesnake Lake

A Renton man plunged into the near-freezing waters of Rattlesnake Lake Sunday afternoon, Jan. 2, to rescue a capsized boater.

Workers take a lunch break from lot development at Eagle Point as resident Mary Beth Emert walks her bloodhound

Future Snoqualmie Ridge lots change hands in $50-million-plus sale

This week, the Pulte Group, a Bloomfield, Mich.-based company, bought $50 million in lots and land from Snoqualmie Ridge II Development LLC, a joint venture of Quadrant Homes and Murray Franklyn Family of Companies. The sale included much of the future Ridge inventory in Eagle Pointe, Aster Creek and west of Snoqualmie Parkway, as well as land on Redmond Ridge.

Workers take a lunch break from lot development at Eagle Point as resident Mary Beth Emert walks her bloodhound

Snoqualmie Valley school board braces for current-year budget cuts

The Snoqualmie Valley School District needs to cut about $325,000 from its budget for the current school year. The cuts are a direct result of reductions in state funding, which provides more than 70 percent of the district's annual budget.

Mount Si art students to learn from professional artist on Fall City mural

Fall City Arts is planning to replace a six year-old mural in the Art Park with a new, collaborative piece by professional artist Brian Majors and Mount Si students.

Rescued! Lost Snoqualmie Pass snowshoers found, safe and sound

At least six teams of Kittitas County Search and Rescue personnel are combing Snoqualmie Pass in search of four women who lost their path while snow-shoeing in the Gold Creek area. The women called 9-1-1 Sunday, Dec. 27 at about 4:30 p.m. for help.

The key to the city is in the keeping of Gloria McNeely

Lifetime of achievement: Snoqualmie honors Gloria McNeely with key to city

When the city of Snoqualmie celebrated Gloria McNeely Day last February on the occasion of her 90th birthday, the nearly 70-year resident assumed that was the pinnacle of her recognition as a community leader and volunteer. That's why she was "totally blind-sided, and still in a state of disbelief" when Mayor Matt Larson presented her with a Lifetime Achievement Award and key to the city.

The key to the city is in the keeping of Gloria McNeely

Grinch visits Snoqualmie Valley? Police seek tips in holiday package thefts

Packages stolen from doorsteps and outdoor lights and ornaments that have been torn down are clear signs that the Grinch is visiting the Valley this season. Police in North Bend and Snoqualmie have received a few reports of holiday vandalism this month.

Dylan Riley gets ready to sell hundreds of packages of cookies. He and his mother baked about 100 packages each week to sell as a fund-raiser for Pilgrim

Snoqualmie boy, 11, cooking up treats to help African children

With a little creativity and a lot of flour, 11-year-old Dylan Riley made more than $2,000 to help children in Africa.

Dylan Riley gets ready to sell hundreds of packages of cookies. He and his mother baked about 100 packages each week to sell as a fund-raiser for Pilgrim
Julie Moshay takes a quick break at the Country Pride Restaurant to talk about her experience saving a customer from choking on Sunday Dec. 12.

North Bend waitress serves up life-saving hug

Julie Moshay is a reluctant hero, an avoider of the spotlight. She likes being on the team, and if she has to lead, it's going to be by example. When someone gave her a "World's Best Waitress" pin to wear on her apron, she added a small "in Training" label to the bottom of it. Her actions may be the only reason that truck driver Ralph Snyder is still driving around, but she's not comfortable being called a hero. "I understand why people say 'I just did what anyone would have done,' because that's what I was thinking!" said Moshay, recounting how she saved Snyder's life on Sunday, Dec. 12.

Julie Moshay takes a quick break at the Country Pride Restaurant to talk about her experience saving a customer from choking on Sunday Dec. 12.
Setting up for a bell-ringing shift

This bell’s for you: Snoqualmie Valley Kiwanis, Salvation Army hand ringing duties to volunteers

A Santa hat, that's what I need, I'm thinking. Definitely, a big, furry hat. OK, I'll take any hat, and some mittens would be nice. It's cold and drizzling, and I've learned that I can't sustain any kind of musical rhythm with the Salvation Army bell in my left hand (my right hand is staying warm in my pocket). But no one's complaining about my technique, and they're still putting money in the kettle, so I'm happy. By the time Harold Erland comes back with his coffee, I've seen a mother teaching her little daughter about giving, and another woman make good on her promise to "be right back" with a donation. I've also failed to take anyone's photo as they made their contributions. "You know why?" Erland asked me. "They don't want a picture because the Bible says 'when you give, don't let your left hand know what your right hand is doing,'" quoting Matthew 6:3. Erland had something there.

Setting up for a bell-ringing shift