Carol Ladwig

Sitting at an antique organ

Benefactor helps Carnation museum find new home with old neighbors

Two little boys in the schoolhouse exhibit of the Tolt Historical Society museum are not quite right, and Isabel Jones is fussing over them. The boys in the desks are actually girl dolls, disguised with haircuts, jeans, T-shirts, and golf hats. They look enough like the real thing, Jones thinks, “but they wouldn’t have their hats on if they were in school.” It’s an idea from another time, but it fits right in with most of the displays in the museum, and with their new neighbors. Now sharing space with horse-drawn carriages from the 1920s and ‘30s, the museum will re-open Saturday, April 16, in the Carnation Farm Carriage Barn.

Sitting at an antique organ
Bindlestick owner Hilary Shemasnki planned her Snoqualmie beer and coffee bar to be a welcoming place for everyone. “I want it to turn out to be one of those places you can go into alone

Brewing a dream: Bindlestick ties wandering beer-lover to Snoqualmie

Hilary Shemanski has enjoyed a vagabond lifestyle, from teaching snowboarding at Snoqualmie Pass to living in Australia, and backpacking across Europe, but she’s no hobo. Is she? “I travel a lot, I’m cheap. I’ve been called a hobo before,” Shemanski admitted, “I’ve never hopped a train though. Well, technically.”

Bindlestick owner Hilary Shemasnki planned her Snoqualmie beer and coffee bar to be a welcoming place for everyone. “I want it to turn out to be one of those places you can go into alone
Michelle Protzman of Chaplins Chevrolet inspects a 2011 Volt

Electric Ride: Chevy’s Volt is innovative, environmental and in the Valley

The chiming electronic music that plays when you slide behind the wheel, and the animations on the multi-screen display, are in direct contrast with the machine muscle of this car. But then, so is the label, “electric car.” Chevrolet’s entry into the “green” car market, the new Volt on display at Chaplins Chevrolet in North Bend, is not at all what you might expect to find in an electric car. It’s black, solidly built and sized like a car, with four doors, and seating for four adults. It looked nothing like the eco-friendly go-carts that many (or maybe it’s just me) mentally associate with the label “electric car.”

Michelle Protzman of Chaplins Chevrolet inspects a 2011 Volt

Days of silence, respect: Mount Si, Cedarcrest students stand against bullying in different, yet similar ways

Day of Silence, Day of Respect, Safe Spaces, Use Another Word. All of these are events and programs that students at Mount Si and Cedarcrest High Schools have introduced to address the widespread problem of bullying and harassment in their schools. While none of them are solutions in themselves, all of them strive to raise awareness about the issues, especially for minorities and GLBTQ (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, or Questioning) youth.

Staff and owners of the new Carnation Market pictured from left are: front

Quick change: QFC out, Market in at Carnation

When Carnation residents found out last week that their only grocery store, the Carnation QFC, would close its doors March 31, they reacted pretty much in the same way. Ronda Sjavik called a friend with the news, saying "I knew you'd be in mourning with me, so I had to tell you what happened!" "That's bad!" said another woman, abruptly setting the plant she'd been examining into her cart on the store's last day. To everyone's relief, the store was closed only overnight, and re-opened Friday morning as the Carnation Market. The new owners, Sean Skiles and Ali Hayton, say they are excited to be in the city.

Staff and owners of the new Carnation Market pictured from left are: front
Ken Meadors and fellow residents of the Fall City Campground relocate and try to stay dry near the Raging River early Thursday

Flooded Lower Snoqualmie Valley residents wait for water to drop

Maybe this one wouldn’t be as bad as predicted, Ken Meadors hoped. Lower Valley flooding had already forced the evacuation of the permanent residents of the Snoqualmie River RV Park and Campground in Fall City Wednesday afternoon, March 30, and Meadors was bracing for another move as Thursday morning’s forecasted crest neared.

Ken Meadors and fellow residents of the Fall City Campground relocate and try to stay dry near the Raging River early Thursday
Above a display case containing dozens of jars of marijuana buds and sample specimens

Alternative medicine: Preston medical marijuana collective aims to change views amid legal gray areas

Inside, it’s a small, windowless space with a computer, a dog crate, and a couple of display cases. Inside the dog crate is a restless bulldog. Inside the cases are cannabis candies, capsules, cigarettes, lotions, and jar upon jar of dried marijuana flowers, or bud. A large sculpture of a seven-lobed leaf is mounted on the wall, and there’s a distinctive scent in the air.

Above a display case containing dozens of jars of marijuana buds and sample specimens
Getting EJ Roberts Park ready for spring

Adopt-a-park: Volunteers sought to give North Bend green spaces some TLC

Grab some gloves and a shovel, your roundabout needs you. So says North Bend Senior Planner Mike McCarty, referring to the city’s First Street roundabout, which could use some green thumb assistance and a few flowers.

Getting EJ Roberts Park ready for spring
Isabel Scott studied Annie Sullivan for her presentation. The teacher known best for her work with Helen Keller

Hstory comes to life at Cascade View Elementary’s ‘wax museum’ experience

Famous figures from history took pint-sized form last Wednesday, March 23, in the classrooms and hallways of Cascade View Elementary School. All fourth grade students chose an important person to impersonate for an hour-long “wax museum” experience.

Isabel Scott studied Annie Sullivan for her presentation. The teacher known best for her work with Helen Keller

Hundreds view job posting for next Mount Si High School principal

The search for a principal to replace retiring Randy Taylor, which commenced last week, will include input from students, parents, school staff and the general community.

Opstad Elementary’s Sharon Piper annually introduces third graders to the life cycle of fish. Piper is a 2011 Snoqualmie Valley Schools Foundation Teacher of the Year.

Snoqualmie Valley’s Teachers of the Year make learning fun, relevant

It is March Madness at Chief Kanim Middle School, and Chris Blake, a teacher and coach of football and basketball, is at the center of a flurry of boys trying to fill out their team brackets and follow along with the NCAA men's basketball championships. He uses the school's tournament mania to make his favorite subject, math, both fun and relevant to his students. His ability to do that, to make learning spill out of the classroom and into students' lives, is one of the reasons he was named a Snoqualmie Valley Schools Foundation Teacher of the Year on March 9. It's a quality he shares with his fellow Teachers of the Year Sharon Piper at Opstad Elementary School and Kim Sales at Mount Si High School.

Opstad Elementary’s Sharon Piper annually introduces third graders to the life cycle of fish. Piper is a 2011 Snoqualmie Valley Schools Foundation Teacher of the Year.

Carnation to get first traffic signal

Carnation will soon see its first four-way stoplight on Tolt Avenue, a major milestone for the city, its drivers and pedestrians. At its March 15 meeting, the Carnation City Council recommended awarding a contract for the installation of a traffic signal at the intersection of Tolt Avenue and Entwistle Street, plus a marked crosswalk with a flashing yellow light at the intersection of Tolt and West Morrison Street, to Totem Electric of Tacoma.

Finaghty’s co-owners Lisa McCord and Phil Stafford relax at the bar before the lunch crowd arrives. The husband and wife team did their homework before opening the pub

No luck needed: Snoqualmie’s Finaghty’s Irish Pub owners rely on plan, market awareness for success

In the already tough restaurant industry, in a multi-year recession, Finaghty’s Irish Pub shines as an example of success. The Snoqualmie Ridge bar and restaurant opened in February, 2008, expanded nine months later, and has enjoyed steady business growth every year, including a 10 percent jump in 2010.

Finaghty’s co-owners Lisa McCord and Phil Stafford relax at the bar before the lunch crowd arrives. The husband and wife team did their homework before opening the pub
Second grader John Bosworth hauls a vibraphone to the school music room following a class concert Thursday

Young Snoqualmie, part 2: City’s youth boom affects schools, police, YMCA

With the entire second grade set to perform, it was impossible for every parent to get a good view of the Cascade View Elementary stage. So school staff had a simple solution: turn the stage. On Thursday night, March 17, Cascade View's second grade performed its annual concert along the north wall with a full gymnasium's worth of onlookers down in front. Cascade View Elementary's first and second grades are its largest, reflecting Snoqualmie Valley School District's large elementary population as well as the significant number of young people in Snoqualmie, where new census data shows that more than one in three residents is a minor.

Second grader John Bosworth hauls a vibraphone to the school music room following a class concert Thursday

Snoqualmie Valley fundraisers, prayer gathering to help Japan relief effort

Local relief efforts for disaster-struck Japan are taking place on two levels, spiritual and physical. As area schools and churches begin their fund-raising efforts, local residents are also invited to a World Prayers event Thursday, March 17 at the Fall City United Methodist Church.

Dianna Mattoni lifts her year-old son Simon in a dance at the Snoqualmie Library’s story time on Wednesday

Young Snoqualmie: With one in three residents a child, community experiences youth boom

nrollment projections in the Snoqualmie Valley School District increase overall by about 2 percent each year, and the latest U.S. Census results show that 35 percent of the Snoqualmie population is under 18. That represents nearly a 680 percent increase in the under-18 age group since 2000. By comparison, the overall population increased by 543 percent in Snoqualmie, and the youth populations in North Bend and Fall City increased by about 7.5 percent and 18 percent, respectively.

Dianna Mattoni lifts her year-old son Simon in a dance at the Snoqualmie Library’s story time on Wednesday
Mount Si Principal Randy Taylor

Ready to retire: Mount Si High School principal Randy Taylor talks about challenges, accomplishments

Randy Taylor broke out one of his favorite Jerry Garcia-inspired tie-dyed T-shirts last Friday. It was Tie-Dye Day at Mount Si High School, and as… Continue reading

Mount Si Principal Randy Taylor

Residents say North Bend transportation plan needs to look at morning traffic

Citizens and council members last week raised several concerns with the city of North Bend's plans to update its transportation portion of the Comprehensive Plan.

Deli manager Joe Cvar shows Snoqualmie Ridge IGA store manager Charlie McKissick a new product

Signposts to success: Thriving Snoqualmie Valley businesses, leaders share vision for prosperity

Charlie McKissick’s arm is getting tired. He’s been cradling a hand-made Apple Marionberry Crumb pie, and it’s getting heavier as he learns more about it.

Deli manager Joe Cvar shows Snoqualmie Ridge IGA store manager Charlie McKissick a new product
Truck driver Kraig Kinnear

Stuck drivers line up in North Bend, wait for snowbound Snoqualmie Pass to reopen

Trucks backed up for miles around North Bend Monday afternoon, Feb. 28, when heavy snow and a slide prompted the closure of Interstate 90 between Ellensburg and North Bend.

Truck driver Kraig Kinnear