North Bend artists to give children’s benefit

Viola virtuoso and painter Emanuel Vardi and his wife, concert violinist and artist Lenore Vardi — both North Bend residents — are using the universal language of music to advocate for special needs children at an evening benefit, Let Every Child Shine, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at Emerald Ballet Theatre in Bellevue.

  • Wednesday, May 7, 2008 12:00am
  • Opinion

Viola virtuoso and painter Emanuel Vardi and his wife, concert violinist and artist Lenore Vardi — both North Bend residents — are using the universal language of music to advocate for special needs children at an evening benefit, Let Every Child Shine, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at Emerald Ballet Theatre in Bellevue.

The Vardis recently relocated from New York City to North Bend and are sharing their experience and passion for the arts with their Eastside community.

Emanuel Vardi’s achievements include museum exhibitions and time as solo violist and member of the NBC Symphony under famed conductor Arturo Toscanini. Lenore Vardi, a painter, recitalist and chamber musician, has performed and recorded with such artists as Itzhak Perlman and Placido Domingo.

Let Every Child Shine is a benefit evening to raise awareness and funding for quality arts programming for an underserved population. The Vardis will perform, display their artwork, and hold an informal fireside chat about art and music.

For more information about the benefit or programs, e-mail to EBTmusicdanceart@gmail.com or call (425) 883-3405 or (206) 236-8607. Emerald Ballet Theatre is located at 12368 Northup Way, Bellevue.

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