Three Valley schools earn top honors in county’s Green Schools Program

  • Monday, November 20, 2017 12:40pm
  • News

Schools from 34 King County cities and unincorporated areas are reducing waste, increasing recycling, conserving resources, and cutting costs with help from the King County Green Schools Program, including four from the Snoqualmie Valley. North Bend Elementary and Snoqualmie Elementary in the Snoqualmie Valley School District, and Carnation Elementary and Eagle Rock Multi-Age in the Riverview School District, were among the schools to be honored by the program.

The Green Schools Program provides hands-on help and the tools that schools need, such as recycling containers and signs, to make improvements. It has served a growing number of schools each year – from 70 schools in 2008 to 251 schools this year, which is half of all K-12 schools in King County outside the City of Seattle.

Of the 251 schools participating in the program, as of June 232 schools have been recognized as Level One King County Green Schools for their waste reduction and recycling efforts. Of those, 132 were recognized as Level Two, for education and actions focused on energy conservation, including Eagle Rock Multi-Age School. One hundred from Level Two were also recognized as Level Three schools for efforts related to water conservation; and 77 of those, including North Bend, Snoqualmie and Carnation Elementary Schools, were recognized as Sustaining Green Schools for maintaining their Level One through Three practices and adding new conservation strategies and education.

“These 77 schools and two school districts initiated or improved sustainable practices, encouraging students and employees to reduce paper use, reduce food waste, recycle, or conserve energy and water, all of which reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change,” said Dale Alekel, Green Schools Program manager.

In addition to Green Schools Program assistance and recognition, King County offers support for student green teams, an elementary school assembly program, and classroom workshops for grades 1–12 that teach students about conservation.Learn more by contacting Alekel at (206) 477-5267 or dale.alekel@kingcounty.gov.

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