Event attendees check out the Interurban car 523 in the Train Shed Exhibit building. (Evan Pappas/Staff Photo)

Event attendees check out the Interurban car 523 in the Train Shed Exhibit building. (Evan Pappas/Staff Photo)

Snoqualmie Valley’s 2018 Year In Review

Take a look back at 12 of stories from throughout the year.

As 2018 comes to an end, we take a look back at some of the memorable stories from each month. This was a year of building — building parks, building communtiy and building relationships. The Valley community was as active and engaged as ever and their dedication to their neighbors was evident.

We hope you enjoy this short look back at some of memorable moments from throughout 2018.

January

Landslide threatens city water source: The City of Snoqualmie addresses the recent discovery of a landslide along the north fork threatening to damage a primary water source for the city. The city council contracts with Aspect Consulting for site reconnaissance, geologic review, preliminary geotechnical evaluations, and follow up reports. They also hired RH2 Engineering to research and develop recommendations for action to address the short-term dangers and a comprehensive long-term plan.

February

LEO gets a new home: The nonprofit organization Life Enrichment Options begins work on building a new group-housing home in the historic downtown area of Snoqualmie. LEO provides housing, education, recreation and employment services for people with developmental disabilities. Their new home in Snoqualmie will house five residents and a live-in care provider.

March

Interurban Car is museum star: The Northwest Railway Museum’s 110-year-old electric train car No. 523, was commemorated with a painting commissioned by local artist Craig J. Thorpe. Car 523 is the last-known surviving Puget Sound Electric Rail Interurban Car.

April

An Incredible Force: Residents from around the Valley recognized and celebrated the dedicated community advocacy of former Carnation mayor and business owner Lee Grumman after her death. Grumman joined the Carnation city council in 2007 and served for 10 years, with two years as the mayor of the city.

May

Groundbreaking: The city of North Bend broke ground on its new City Hall development project on May 15. The new building will be located adjacent to the city’s public works shop at 1155 East North Bend Way. Building a new City Hall has been a city effort for more than two decades.

June

Torguson’s new bike park opens: After more than a year of work, Si View Metro Parks and the city of North Bend officially opened the newly renovated Torguson Bike Park. The design work and testing could not have been complete without volunteer efforts from the Evergreen Mountain Bike Alliance and the Mount Si Mountain Biking Team.

July

Favor Returned: The Trail Youth received a big surprise this month as they were featured on the hit web-show “Mike Rowe’s Returning the Favor.” Rowe and his team highlight citizens around the country doing work that gives back to their community. The team secretly renovated the Trail Youth’s new location in North Bend into a fully functioning coffee house and meeting space.

August

Seahawks dream fulfilled: North Bend teen Paoloa Joaquin’s Make-a-Wish request was made reality as she was invited to a three-day Seahawks event to meet players and participate in events at CenturyLink Field in Seattle. In remission from leukemia, Joaquin and a group of other kids at the Make-a-Wish event also attended the Indianapolis Colts preseason game.

September

Drone donation: Eastside Fire and Rescue received a donation of a $35,000 drone to be used on future responses to calls for help. The donation was made by longtime EFR supporter Barbara Hamer and an official demonstration was held at Fire Station 87 in North Bend.

October

Youth Activity Center begins construction: The Snoqualmie Valley Youth Activities and Community Center Association acquired a 20-acre property along Boalch Avenue in North Bend to construct an all-new youth meeting space. The previous youth center was badly damaged in 2008, and the organization had not had a permanent location since. The opening is expected in summer 2019.

November

Preserving Affordable Housing: The Mount Si Senior Center received $2 million in funding from King County for the purchase of the Cascade Park Apartments, 28-units of federally subsidized low-income and senior housing. The senior center will continue to raise money to fund the $6.5 million purchase.

December

Plastic banned: The North Bend City Council banned the use of plastic bags at retail stores beginning on Jan. 1, 2019. The ordinance bans disposable plastic bags, requiring recyclable bags as a replacement.

Lee Grumman and Jim Berger, Mayor and Deputy Mayor of Carnation, at the 2011 Fourth of July Parade. Courtesy Photo

Lee Grumman and Jim Berger, Mayor and Deputy Mayor of Carnation, at the 2011 Fourth of July Parade. Courtesy Photo

North Bend council members and staff gathered on Wednesday, May 15 for the official groundbreaking on the new city hall development project. Work will begin in Early June and the building is expected to be completed in one year. Photo courtesy of Mary Miller

North Bend council members and staff gathered on Wednesday, May 15 for the official groundbreaking on the new city hall development project. Work will begin in Early June and the building is expected to be completed in one year. Photo courtesy of Mary Miller

City Staff, Si View Metro Parks staff, volunteers, and bikers gather to officially cut the ribbon on the bike track at Torguson Park. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

City Staff, Si View Metro Parks staff, volunteers, and bikers gather to officially cut the ribbon on the bike track at Torguson Park. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

North Bend’s Paola Joaquin talks with family members in front of her personalized locker at CenturyLink Field in Seattle on Aug. 7. Andy Nystrom/Staff Photo

North Bend’s Paola Joaquin talks with family members in front of her personalized locker at CenturyLink Field in Seattle on Aug. 7. Andy Nystrom/Staff Photo

Reserve Firefighter David Geller takes the drone for a short flight around the North Bend Fire Station. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Reserve Firefighter David Geller takes the drone for a short flight around the North Bend Fire Station. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Volunteer crews work to build the walls of the main building on Saturday afternoon. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Volunteer crews work to build the walls of the main building on Saturday afternoon. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Volunteers serve coffee to community members as the film crew prepares to surprise the Trail Youth owners. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

Volunteers serve coffee to community members as the film crew prepares to surprise the Trail Youth owners. Evan Pappas/Staff Photo

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