Snoqualmie Tribe donation programs run throughout the year, giving back to the local community. In November 2017, Snoqualmie Tribe volunteers collected turkeys for distribution to families and seniors in need. (Photo courtesy of the Snoqualmie Tribe)

Snoqualmie Tribe donation programs run throughout the year, giving back to the local community. In November 2017, Snoqualmie Tribe volunteers collected turkeys for distribution to families and seniors in need. (Photo courtesy of the Snoqualmie Tribe)

Snoqualmie Tribe opens annual nonprofit grant program in 2019

The Snoqualmie Tribe is bringing back their Charitable Donations program in January of 2019.

The Snoqualmie Indian Tribe is once again taking applications for its annual Charitable Donations program beginning on Jan. 1, 2019.

Each year the tribe allocates funding to various organizations from throughout the area that apply under several available categories. The donation program began in 2010, and the tribe has since donated more than $8 million to nonprofit organizations serving communities in Washington state.

Grants of as much as $50,000 each will be allocated in the categories of salmon habitat restoration, Snoqualmie Valley community services, veterans services, native services, family services, senior/elder Services, arts and culture and environmental education.

Four grants are available in the Snoqualmie Valley community services category and two are available in the native services category.

The application process is open for 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations recognized by the Internal Revenue Service. Applicants must operate in the State of Washington.

Some of the application requirements include a letter from the organization detailing their mission, vision, values, history, and an overview of their services, programs and the communities they serve. How the funding would be used in relation to the category the application is filed for should be included as well.

Nonprofits can submit applications on the tribe’s Charitable Donation website snoqualmietribedonations.us from Jan. 1 to March 31. The funding decision will be made in the early summer.

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