Snoqualmie Tribe holds rally in opposition to roundabout construction

On Wednesday, Sept. 2 representatives from the Snoqualmie Tribe held a rally in protest of the Tokul roundabout construction project in Snoqualmie. Wednesday was also the sixth anniversary of Snoqualmie Falls being registered at the National Register of Historic Places.

Lois Sweet Dorman gives a passionate speech to all the supporters of the Save the Snoqualmie Falls rally.

On Wednesday, Sept. 2 representatives from the Snoqualmie Tribe held a rally in protest of the Tokul roundabout construction project in Snoqualmie. Wednesday was also the sixth anniversary of Snoqualmie Falls being registered at the National Register of Historic Places.

Supporters came out with protest signs and shirts supporting the Save Snoqualmie Falls initiative started by the Snoqualmie Tribe. The rally started with a song by Tribe members before representatives from the Tribal Council spoke to the crowd.

Carolyn Lubenau, Chariwoman of the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe, and Lois Sweet Dorman, Snoqualmie Indian Tribe councilwoman, spoke to the crowd about the land around the falls and the city’s planned development.

“There was a projectile point that was unearthed at the Tokul roundabout when they started excavating, we told them, we’ve been telling them for decades what this place is. That projectile point, they call it an Olcott point, 4000 to 9000 years old.” Sweet Dorman said. “That is a sign from our ancient ones speaking out. They’re asking us ‘stand up, stand up, fight for this place.”

Sweet Dorman expressed gratitude for all the support the group has received so far. Melynda Davis, a Snoqualmie Tribe alternate councilwoman, was called to speak to the crowd after Sweet Dorman. She asked supporters to spread the word of their cause.

“Not just your neighbors,” she said, “reach out to your congresspeople, reach out to your elected officials of King County, reach out to the city of Snoqualmie elected officials and let your voice be heard,” Davis said. “Join us.”

 

Preserving cultural and natural heritage was one of the major themes of the rally and something that many of the supporters felt was important.

Supporters dressed in ‘Save Snoqualmie Falls’ shirts and carried handmade signs in protest of the construction.

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