Snoqualmie Parks and Public Works director retires

Parks and Public Works director Daniel Marcinko announced he will retire from the city on July 1.

Dan Marcinko

Dan Marcinko

Snoqualmie’s Parks and Public Works director Daniel Marcinko has announced he will retire from his position on July 1 after 10 years with the city.

Marcinko has worked in Parks and Public Works since 2009 on projects from infrastructure to the revitalization of the historic downtown. In 2014 he was named Best City Employee in a Best of the Valley poll.

Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson released a statement thanking Marcinko for the work he has put into the city for a decade.

“Dan was a valuable contributor to the city over the past 10 years,” Larson said. “The city of Snoqualmie is a better place due to his decade of service to our town. We wish Dan all the best in his future endeavors — whatever they might be — and joy from more time with his family.”

Marcinko also included a brief statement saying he is retiring to spend more time with his family and pursue other goals.

“I have truly appreciated the support of the citizens of Snoqualmie over the past 10 years,” Marcinko said. “While I look forward to my retirement and spending more time with my family and pursuing other interests outside of public life, I will miss being part of a team and the city.”

In a news release, the city said a transition and succession plan has been established, and it is working to smoothly transition in a new director for the department to avoid any disruption to the services provided to residents.

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