Consul-General Miguel Velasquez of the Consulate of Peru in Seattle and Mayor JuHong Kang from Gangjin, Korea, help Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson and North Bend Mayor Ken Hearing officially dedicate Sister Cities Park right next door to Snoqualmie City Hall last summer. Evan Pappas/File Photo

Sister Cities Association board members resign, leaving three vacancies on all-volunteer nonprofit board

The Snoqualmie Sister Cities Association has undergone some recent changes, with three board members resigning from their positions. Members of the board will meet Tuesday, Oct. 3, to discuss appointments to the vacant seats and determine a future course for the nonprofit association that has fostered cultural exchange programs with the cities of Gangjin, Korea, and Chaclacayo, Peru.

President Tina McCollum, treasurer Mary Corcoran, and member Krista Gordon all resigned.

McCollum, who was a part of the organization for almost 10 years and served as the board president for two terms, said she had already told the board she would not return as president for a third term in order to spend more time with family. When a former volunteer with the organization began making unfounded accusations of fraud against her earlier this year, McCollum said she decided to resign early.

McCollum said she was being attacked by the community member and did not want to go through any more “verbal abuse.”

McCollum said she was glad to have been a part of the organization that has allowed students to experience different cultures from around the world for so many years.

At its last meeting, the association board accepted the resignations and voted to suspend exchange trips for 2018. Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson, a member of the board, added that the resignations would have a definite impact on the all-volunteer organization and that 2018 would “probably be a rebuilding year.”

Anyone interested in serving on the Snoqualmie Sister Cities Association board of directors can contact Snoqualmie City Hall for information.

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