Pilot King County Parks app lets visitors ID parks and trails issues, track their resolution

  • Monday, February 27, 2017 7:30am
  • News

Whether it’s a fallen tree, graffiti, or a damaged sign, visitors to any of King County Parks’ 200 parks or 175 miles of regional trails can now quickly report the problem and easily track its resolution, thanks to a free app called SeeClickFix.

A partnership between Parks and SeeClickFix, a leading digital communications system company, lets parks and trails visitors be the eyes and ears on the ground, identifying issues or requesting repairs, using locational, descriptive, and photographic information.

King County Parks is piloting this tool over the next several months with the goal of streamlining incoming service requests and improve communications with the public.

King County Parks is alerted to an issue as soon as a problem is registered through SeeClickFix. Parks employees will provide real-time updates as the matter undergoes resolution, and the person who reported the issue, as well as anyone else using the online tool or mobile app, can follow along until the issue has been resolved.

Available online at www.seeclickfix.com, this customer service tool also allows park and trail visitors to view and comment on issues submitted by others. They can even establish “watch areas” to receive notifications about all issues reported in a specified geographic area, enabling them to follow the progress of any issue, not just the ones they submitted.

The app is also available on iPhone through the App Store and on Android devices through the Google Play Store.

King County Parks offers more than 200 parks and 28,000 acres of open space, including such regional treasures as Marymoor Park and Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park, 175 miles of regional trails and 215 miles of backcountry trails.

For more information about King County parks and trails, visit http://www.kingcounty.gov/services/parks-recreation/parks.aspx.

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